Why You Should Eat Brazil Nuts (CC)

Why You Should Eat Brazil Nuts (CC)

August 12, 2019 81 By William Morgan


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Brazil nuts are not only delicious,
they are also quite beneficial to body builders,
people who want to continue looking and feeling
youthful,
and those suffering from thyroid disorders.
Brazil nuts are a complete protein, because
they contain all nine essential amino acids,
which are needed for Human growth and development,
and required for muscle tissue repair.
Bodybuilding requires amino acids to support
muscle recovery and growth.
Brazil nuts contain high levels of Methionine,
one of the most important essential amino
acids.
Methionine plays an essential role in the
prevention of chronic illnesses, as well as
fending off premature aging symptoms and signs.
This includes “Middle-age spread”, provided
you don’t overindulge. Brazil nuts are relatively
high in calories, but have a high fiber content
that will leave you feeling full and satisfied.
You need only eat ONE Brazil nut to reach
your daily recommended allowance of Selenium
(70-90 mcg per nut).
Just one!
An ounce will give you approximately 544 mcg
of Selenium.
That’s 777% of the recommended daily allowance
of selenium. Far greater than the RDA! Needless
to say, if you have Brazil nuts on hand, you’ve
no need for supplemental selenium.
Your thyroid cannot function properly without
selenium. Selenium boosts fat metabolism,
may help to treat prostate cancer, and improves
skin healing following burn injuries.
In addition, Selenium’s antioxidant properties
regenerate vitamins E and C, thereby decreasing
the aging of skin. And who doesn’t want that?
A 1 ounce serving of Brazil nuts contains
about 65 mg of magnesium. Amongst plant foods,
Brazil nuts are one the riches in magnesium.
Magnesium is a vital mineral that not only
supports the absorption of calcium in the
body, it’s absolutely necessary for the formation
of healthy teeth and bones.
Adequate intake of magnesium can greatly lower
your risk of Osteoporosis.
Magnesium also supports heart health, by helping
to maintain healthy blood pressure levels,
normalizing heart rhythm and insuring appropriate
blood clotting in the heart.
This reduces the risk of heart attack and
stroke. And should you suffer a stroke, Magnesium
aids stroke recovery by assisting the formation
of new cells and relaxing stiff and strained
muscles.
And for those suffering from constipation,
in spite of consuming an adequate amount of
fiber in their diet, consuming more magnesium
may be the answer.
In addition, the Magnesium found in Brazil
nuts releases the energy in your body slowly,
doling out calories over a longer period of
time.
It also aids the release of energy from other
foods, which helps muscle and nerve function.
Also, by releasing the energy slowly throughout
the day, you feel fuller longer, and can more
easily resist the urge to overeat.
Most of the fat found in Brazil nuts is the
healthy unsaturated variety, which is good
for the heart, according to the American Heart
Association.
Of the 19 g of fat contained in 1 oz. Of Brazil
nuts, 41% is monounsaturated and 34% is polyunsaturated.
Keep in mind that Brazil nuts still contain
the highest amount of saturated fat of any
nut — one serving provides 21 percent of
the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA).
So, don’t consume more than one serving of
Brazil nuts per day, if you want to keep your
daily fat intake under control.
As with most things that seem too good to
be true, Brazil nuts do have a downside.
Eating too many, too often, can lead to serious
health problems over time.
This is because of their high Selenium content.
Read my April 2013 article, “Selenium: Why
Too Little or Too Much Can Be Deadly” for
more information.
Also, Brazil nuts’ high fat content means
that they will go rancid fairly quickly and
must be kept refrigerated. You can even freeze
them if you like.
Despite the caveats, Brazil nuts are a food
well worth adding to the shopping list.
For more information on food nutrition and
more specifically Amino Acids, Selenium and
Magnesium, visit my blog — Holistic Health
& Living. You’ll find the link in the description
box below.
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