Why Am I Always Tired? #kickstart2019

Why Am I Always Tired? #kickstart2019

July 21, 2019 69 By William Morgan


(bright instrumental music)
– Hey, Muchies, how are you doing today?
Sleepy, are you always
tired, a lot of you are.
I know because a lot of you comment
or send me emails asking,
why am I always tired?
Well, it’s hard to say without
knowing you, of course.
But I did some research, and it turns out
a lot of fatigue and tiredness is relevant
to lifestyle, health, and nutrition.
So I figured out it would
fit right in on this channel.
Let’s talk about the most obvious
reasons you might be tired.
Sleep-related causes, such as
you’re not getting enough sleep.
We live in a stressful time,
we’re busy, we can’t slow down.
And if something has to get cut out
of our schedule it
likely will be our sleep.
Sleep needs vary by the individual,
but it’s recommended that most adults get
at least seven hours or more
per night for optimal health.
When we don’t get enough sleep our brain
and body doesn’t have the rest it needs
to function and feel refreshed.
And over time that accumulates sleep debt.
Now, we actually can
make up for missed hours
and reverse short-term
effects of sleep deprivation.
But that’s only for recent sleep debt,
over the past few months to a year.
It’s not forgotten over
long periods of time.
And chronic sleep deprivation
does have severe consequences.
The next is poor sleep quality.
It’s not just the amount of sleep hours,
but how restful that time in bed is.
The most common environmental disturbances
that disrupt sleep are blue
light from screens, TV,
computer, and phones,
ambient noise, temperatures
being too warm or too cold,
an uncomfortable mattress,
and restless pets or
kids sharing your bed.
It is normal to sleep badly sometimes,
even in phases of days or weeks.
Next is sleeping at the wrong times.
So, napping a lot during
the day or staying awake
throughout the night can
both lead to fatigue.
Yes, napping can help you catch up
on sleep debt, but if it’s a part
of your regular schedule
it can be damaging.
Sleeping at night is best when possible
because daytime sleep disrupts
your body’s circadian rhythm,
which is affected by light and
darkness throughout the day.
The next reasons you might be
tired are diet related causes.
A healthy and balanced diet can make
a huge difference in your fatigue.
First, sugar and refined carbs.
Too much and blood
sugar is going to spike,
and crash, and leave you tired.
Less processed carbohydrates
and sugar will mean more energy.
Too few calories, without enough fuel
your metabolism is slowing down trying
to conserve energy, so
you end up feeling tired.
Calories are your body’s
energy for the movement
and basic functions like breathing.
If you aren’t getting enough energy
into the body it has
nothing to run off of.
Vitamin deficiencies,
vitamins and minerals
are essential micronutrients
because your body needs them
to perform important functions.
If we’re deficient in things
like iron and B vitamins,
which are especially important for energy
that can contribute to fatigue.
Not eating enough protein, protein boosts
the metabolic rate more
than carbohydrates or fat.
So getting sufficient protein
from high-quality sources
can help with your energy levels.
Trying to include protein
at ever meal can help.
Dehydration, many studies have shown
that even mild dehydration can
lead to lower energy levels,
poor concentration, and reduced alertness.
We know from last week’s
episode that 75% of Americans
are chronically dehydrated,
and most don’t realize it.
Check out that video for some tips
on how to drink more water.
Caffeine, things like caffeine, sugar,
energy drinks, amino
acids, they all provide
immediate energy boosts
that last a few hours.
But after that boost many
people become sleepy.
So, then, some people have caffeine
in the afternoon, even
if it’s a small amount.
But that can also disrupt sleep
and lead to lower energy levels
the next day, so it’s a nasty cycle.
Cutting back on caffeine could be worth it
if you’re dependent on it for energy.
Food allergies or sensitivities.
These can cause fatigue
and low energy levels.
And it’s often an overlooked symptom.
But it can be a warning sign
of a food intolerance or allergy.
Leaky gut, you’ve probably
heard of leaky gut by now.
It’s when your digestive tract is damaged
and small holes develop in the gut lining.
The inflammation that can be caused
by leaky gut can lead to
tiredness and fatigue.
So healing your gut could
help with you being tired too.
Also, FYI, I do have a free course
on inflammation, teaching you what it is,
and how to develop your
own anti-inflammatory diet.
The link is in the description box.
Following up on diet, we’ve got
some lifestyle related causes of fatigue.
The first is a sedentary lifestyle.
It sounds backwards,
but being inactive can
actually make you feel more
fatigue with less energy.
Even a little bit of physical activity
can give you an energy boost.
Regular exercise is of
course recommended and great,
but even just a little bit
could help with your fatigue.
The other is high stress levels.
Many studies link excessive
and chronic stress to fatigue.
Remember, a little bit
of stress is normal,
but too much can make you tired.
And if it’s prolonged
it can lead to physical
and emotional exhaustion, and of course,
affect your overall quality of sleep.
If you’re stressed don’t
avoid dealing with it
because it’s only going
to make you more tired.
Try to manage it if you can.
Mind-body practices
like yoga and meditation
have shown to help relieve stress.
So, if you reduce your stress
you’ll reduce your fatigue.
Okay, those are the
lifestyle related causes,
but there are still more
reasons you could be tired,
like mental health related causes.
Anxiety or emotional stress,
both of these deplete
your energy levels and leave you fatigued.
They can also lead to sleep disorders.
Depression, common symptoms of depression
are trouble falling asleep, waking up
during the night, or trouble waking up
in the morning, sleeping
too much, et cetera.
But untreated depression can also
lead to feeling tired or fatigued.
Then, poor sleep worsens
the symptoms of depression,
so it’s another tough cycle to break.
If you are dealing with depression
it’s likely contributing
negatively to your sleep.
And if you suspect that
you might need help
I definitely encourage you to reach out
because it’s only going to
get harder to get through
if you are chronically tired
and stuck in that cycle.
(bright instrumental music)
There is also seasonal
affective disorder, or SAD.
Some people experience depressive
symptoms and fatigue due
to low light exposure
during shorter winter days.
If you notice you feel more
tired and sad, specifically
during the winter months,
this could be affecting you.
And it might be worth looking into.
There are also other
physical health conditions
where fatigue is a key symptom.
So if nothing on the
list above is resonating,
probably, something is because
none of us are perfect,
and could all probably at
least tighten up our diet
and lifestyles a little
bit as a starting point.
But it’s worth noting that
other physical conditions
like hormone imbalances, adrenal fatigue,
hypothyroidism, hepatitis,
diabetes, heart disease,
fibromyalgia, rheumatoid
arthritis, pregnancy,
et cetera have fatigue as a key symptom.
Again, I don’t think
most people need to jump
to those health conditions
as the reasons they’re tired.
I think we should go down
the list of sleep, diet,
lifestyle, and mental
health related causes first.
But just be aware and open to listening
to what your body has to say.
I hope you have found these lists helpful,
and that you can start narrowing in
on what might be
contributing to your fatigue.
Also, just know that you are powerful.
You have so much to say
in how your body functions
based on those lifestyle, diet,
and mental health choices.
We, of course, can’t always control
what conditions and
limitations we’re forced
to deal with in our
bodies and environments.
But we have a lot of choices we can make
that positively influence our health,
and of course, our sleep quality as well.
Thanks so much for being
here today, I appreciate you.
I hope you have an
energized rest of your day.
And I will see you tomorrow
for our brand new episode.
And, remember, it’s all a
matter of Mind Over Munch.