What’s the Difference Between a Low Carb Ketogenic Diet & the Atkin’s Diet?

What’s the Difference Between a Low Carb Ketogenic Diet & the Atkin’s Diet?

October 18, 2019 14 By William Morgan


I have another question for you. You had mentioned
with the ketosis and the ketogenic diet, to
me it sounds
almost like the Atkin’s diet, if you remember
from 20 years ago or so when the Atkin’s
diet was real
popular.
Dr. David Jockers: Yep
Ty: Is that—is it the same thing as the
Atkin’s diet or what is different? When you
hear the ketogenic
diet versus the old Atkin’s diet that a
lot of body builders that I knew back in the
90s went from the low
fat diet to the Atkin’s diet where they
were literally guys that at the gym working
out eating cheese and
bacon and peanut butter in between sets. What’s
the difference between these two types of
diets?
Dr. David Jockers: Yeah. That’s a great,
great question. I’m really glad you brought
that up because in
general the Atkin’s diet is a ketogenic
diet. It does stimulate ketone development.
And the way that some
individuals teach it it’s still—they’re
almost identical. However, when we’re really
trying to promote optimal health we’ve got
to make some differentiations from the Atkin’s
diet. So where Atkin’s went right was his
approach with a low carbohydrate diet, getting
our body running off the ketones. So I’m
in total agreement with him about that. Keeping
our body very sensitive to insulin is very,
very important. However, where I disagree
with him was he really had no regulation on
the kind of fats that you put into your body.
And we want to really
focus on good fats as opposed to bad fats.
So most people in our society assume that
saturated fat is a bad
fat. What we know is that actually saturated
fat is one of the most healthiest fats we can be
putting in our body. The
fats we really want to avoid are high omega-6
fats from refined vegetable oils and also
from factory farmed
animal meats. So that’s a big one. And then,
of course, trans fats or manmade fats. And
so we certainly want
to make sure we’re avoiding those things.
And so we’re going to load up on good fats,
things like avocadoes,
things like coconut oil, butter from grass
fed cows, okay. Individuals that can tolerate
dairy protein. If they can
tolerate casein we’re going to use things
like cheese, raw cheese from grass-fed cows,
fermented dairy drinks
from again, grass-fed cows. There’s a huge
difference between when a cow is fed grass
and grains. A grain-fed cow actually grows
much larger and produces a lot more dairy.
In fact, they produce about 20 to 30
thousand pounds of dairy in a year, a grain-fed
cow. A grass-fed cow produces about three to five thousand
pounds. There’s a huge difference in yield.
Now the grain-fed cow though, the grains themselves
are high in this omega-6 fat. And omega-6
fat causes
inflammation in our body. So the dairy that’s
coming from a grain-fed cow is very high in
omega-6, very low in
omega-3. That’s going to be inflammatory.
And that inflammatory process, high omega-6,
low omega-3,
provides a ripe environment for cancer cell
development in our body. So we definitely want
to stay away from
commercially raised animal products and animals
that were fed grains. We want to stay away from that. But
we do want the grass-fed animal products because
they have a lot of omega-3s, an ideal ratio
of omega-6 to
omega-3s. Also grass-fed dairy has a molecule
called CLA, conjugulated linoleic acid, which
many
researchers are finding is a potent anticarcinogen.
There’s also other great nutrients in there.
For example,
the major fat that’s in grass-fed dairy
is called butyric acid. Butyric acid is a
preferred fuel source for healthy
gut microbes in your system and it helps your
intestinal cells to develop and actually to
strengthen so that way
we don’t develop problems like leaky gut
and ulcerations in our gut and things like
that, which is extremely
important for helping our immune system. Seventy
percent of our immune system’s in our gut.
And if we have
damage to our gut we’re going to have a
lot of immune system disorders which could
include cancer and other
autoimmune diseases. So this grass-fed raw
dairy can have an incredible effect at helping
the gut to heal and
seal and to control itself well. So that’s
why it’s such a good fat source we want
to include.
We also want to include things like extra
virgin olive oil, healthy seeds like flax
seed, hemp seeds, chia seeds,
we talked about coconut products. That should
be an absolute staple. Coconut is a super
food, very anti-inflammatory and just powerful
for our body. So these are the kind of good
fats we want to focus on. We want
to stay away from—again, Atkin’s never
differentiated between grass-fed and grain-fed
so it was a lot of
commercial animal products using lard and
bacon and things like that. And the other
aspect of it is that bacon,
I am really not a big fan of just from the
perspective that it is cooked at very high
temperatures. And it may be
nitrate free which is certainly a better one
to go with, but when you cook meat at a very
high temperature,
you’re going to produce a lot of carcinogenic
products. Things like heterocyclic amines,
polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons, acrylamide, and these are known
to cause cancer growth in our body. And so
high heat or
highly cooked, highly processed animal products,
even if it’s properly raised can also be a
factor with cancer
cell development. So we want to look for animal
products that have been minimally processed.
And when we
cook them we want to cook them more medium
rare so a lower temperature and just cooking
them for less
time so that way we produce less of those
heterocyclic amines. And there are a lot of
different strategies that
people can apply with marinades and things
like that to utilize animal products and minimize
the production of
carcinogenic chemicals.