Turmeric Benefits explained by a Dietitian | You Versus Food | Well+Good

Turmeric Benefits explained by a Dietitian | You Versus Food | Well+Good

November 8, 2019 19 By William Morgan


♪ And I’m proud to be a tumerican ♪
♪ Where at least I know I’m ♪
(inhales)
– Whoa. (laughs)
(upbeat music)
Hi, I’m Tracy Lockwood Beckerman,
a registered dietician in New York City,
and it’s my job to help you
figure out what to eat and why.
Today’s topic is turmeric,
you might have been hearing
all about its anti-inflammatory
properties recently.
You are rockin’ some
anti-inflammatory power.
But, is a golden milk latte
worth its weight in gold,
or is turmeric not gonna spice up your life
as much as you might have thought?
Go for the gold, this is the good stuff.
Let’s get to the root of turmeric,
on this episode of You vs. Food.
(upbeat music)
Turmeric is a spice made from
the root of the turmeric plant,
which is related to ginger.
So turmeric, are you really excited
to go on tour with the Spice Girls?
Yes I am! (laughs)
It is grown in India,
Asia, and Central America,
and has been incorporated in holistic
medicine practice for centuries.
You’ve most likely seen it as
a cooking spice on its own,
that’s when the root is peeled,
boiled, dried and ground up.
It’s also a main
ingredient in curry powder.
(upbeat music)
There’s a compound in
turmeric called curcumin,
which has anti-inflammatory
and antioxidant powers.
Turmeric has been linked
to many health benefits,
from settling an upset stomach
to managing anxiety, to
reducing the risk of developing
heart disease and even Alzheimer’s.
Hence why everyone is
calling it a superfood,
which I guess means it has a day job,
then puts a cape on at
night and saves the world.
Super spice!
(upbeat music)
A good amount of research has actually
been done on this little guy.
There have been randomized control trials
investigating the benefits of turmeric,
which is considered the
gold standard of research.
Takeaways were predominantly inconclusive,
but turmeric actually does look promising
for anti-inflammatory effects and can even
help relieve soreness
after a hard workout.
So, crush those squats and have
a turmeric-infused meal after.
I know you may think you’re all that,
but you stain everything.
(upbeat music)
Here’s the key to getting
the most out of turmeric:
pair it with black pepper.
Curcumin isn’t easily absorbed on its own,
but when you add black pepper to the mix,
the piperine compound in back pepper
blocks your liver from filtering
and getting rid of that turmeric too fast.
That means you’ll be able to get more
of those benefits of turmeric
in your system for longer.
Tumeric and black pepper, name
a more iconic duo, I’ll wait.
Also, curcumin is fat soluble,
meaning you should eat some
fat with it to properly absorb.
My favorite ways of getting turmeric,
coat walnuts with turmeric and black pepper
and toast them in a pan.
Sprinkle some turmeric and
black pepper on your eggs,
or mix that same delicious
combo in your avocado mash.
Turmeric isn’t a disease-curing, magical fairy dust
But some of the science is promising
when it comes to the potent anti-inflammatory effects
Still, there’s a lot
more research to be done,
but there are actually
some current studies
on how it can help treat and protect us
from a variety of cancers,
colitis, diabetes,
and surgical pain, like
right now, how exciting!
Robert Frost once wrote,
nothing gold can stay.
But it’s time we make an
exception because I believe
that turmeric deserves
a place in your pantry.
Eat this Robert Frost!
See you next time for another
episode of You vs. Food.
(upbeat music)
Subscribe to Well+Good’s YouTube channel
for more episodes of You vs. Food,
like right now, over here, you can do it.
(upbeat music)
And we can cut the
curcumin, no, that’s okay.