This Vitamin Reverses Calcification In Your Arteries, Can You Guess Which one?

This Vitamin Reverses Calcification In Your Arteries, Can You Guess Which one?

January 29, 2020 38 By William Morgan


Hi guys! I’m going to talk to you about something that’s really interesting there we are in the middle of an epidemic of
calcification of arteries in this country. So, as people get osteoporosis
their arteries calcify. A normal healthy artery pulsates every time the heart
beats. So with that pulsation, the body can regulate its blood pressure, it
can get a good pulse wave to extremities, and so you can nourish the whole body. As people age, for various reasons that we’re going to talk about in a minute, their
arteries can start to get calcified. They get inflammation in the inner wall of
the artery. That inflammation is usually caused by infections or toxins
and it causes an injury. As part of the healing of that injury calcium is
deposited, as part of the scar. This is very close to my heart because my dad
was a chronic smoker. He had heart bypass when he was in his early 50s and
then he also had calcification in his aorta. Eventually one night, his
aorta ruptured and that caused him to die because the artery basically turned into bone. Almost like bone. When the aorta
ruptured, there was nothing that could be done. Now, we know today that this process is reversible and one of the things that helps reverse it is vitamin K. Now, there
been some very nice studies; vitamin K is a fat soluble vitamin. Usually the
sources for us are green leafy vegetables but, actually in terms of food
sources the highest source is natto, which is like the Japanese bean. It has the actual highest source of vitamin K. Things like broccoli, spinach and
kale are good sources and when they’re eaten with fats the absorption is good.
Much of the vitamin K in our body is actually produced by our own gut
bacteria. So, if you’re on medication that destroys gut bacteria you may not be
making enough vitamin K. So, this is a really important nutrient. Because the
way vitamin K works is it keeps the calcium in the bones; 99% of the calcium
in the body is in the bones and we want to keep the calcium in the bones and out
of the soft tissues. When there’s adequate vitamin K in the body and in
the bones it it holds and stabilizes the calcium within the bones. When the level
isn’t enough, it can leach out of the bones, it can go other places where
there is inflammation both acute and chronic.There’s some very interesting
studies that were done to look at artery wall stiffness. Like in our office we
have a machine that will measure artery wall stiffness. “How compliant are your
arteries?” Of course young people have really compliant arteries and as people
age they tend to stiffen from calcium. They found that when they
supplemented with about a hundred and eighty micro-grams a day of vitamin K;
vitamin K comes in many sources but, the ones that we want are vitamin K
one, four, seven. If you get a vitamin K supplement, you want
one ideally that has those things in it. One, two, four and seven. Okay? Because they seem to work the best.
Then you want good gut bacteria, so that they can also be making your vitamin K.
They found that over a three-year period, that they had about a five
percent decrease in the calcium score in the arteries, compared to people who
didn’t supplement with vitamin K. They had a one point three percent
increase in the calcium. So, this process can be slowly undone. I think because
of the amount of inflammatory problems there are in bodies today. that it’s worth it to supplement with a good vitamin K
supplement that’s a mixed vitamin K. Now if you’re taking green foods that helps
or you’re taking green concentrated powders that helps. Because we’re putting in vitamin K in those forms. If you like and want to eat natto, that’s good but,
taking a vitamin K supplement I think is good too. When they tested people it was
a hundred eighty micro-grams. You’ll find these supplements in various
places and I would just look into it. I think sometimes the the K is
supplemented or in the same package as a vitamin D and it seems to me that’s a
good one. The vitamin D pulls calcium into the bones, the vitamin K keeps it
there. So, if you have a history of coronary artery disease, hypertension,
atherosclerosis or heart fails with calcium, then I would certainly suggest
that you supplement with an extra vitamin K. It will help you to
slow this process and actually even reverse this process. Concentrate
in your diet on making sure you’re getting plenty of greens and nurture
your gut. Watch how many antibiotics you take and for sure if you’re on drugs
that block vitamin K, then you have to make sure that you get adequate levels.
You should bring that up to your physician. Okay? So, watch your vitamin K.
It could really help you and it can undo the calcium in your arteries. Have a good
day.