THINGS I LEARNED AFTER BECOMING A DIETITIAN

THINGS I LEARNED AFTER BECOMING A DIETITIAN

November 4, 2019 14 By William Morgan


I didn’t fully grasp it ,c hew it up,
swallow it, digest and assimilate it into my being
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So hi everyone. Welcome back to my channel so today we’re going to be
speaking about a few things that I did
not learn during my dietetic internship!
So I don’t know if this is true for
every dietitian, but a few dietitians I
have met we also same thing. There are
few things that we did not learn during
our dietetic internship. So let’s not
waste any time and get right into it. Let
me just first start by saying this is
not to throw shade at any dietetic
internship at any dietitian. No, that is
that the whole entire point of making
this video, but there are some things
that I feel that you do not actually
learn until you’re in the field and what
I mean by learn like yes, it’s reviewed,
but you don’t fully grasp it. I know for
me the type of learner that I am I’m
someone that needs to see the same thing
over and over and over again so that I
can take it, assimilate it, and it become
a part of me. The first thing that I did not learn
was to actually learn how to listen! Let
me be honest with you when I was doing
my out patient diabetes internship the
dietitian did say to me “Kim you need to
read in between the lines.” Silence is not
bad a lot of people you know when you’re
speaking, especially someone that you
don’t know, you try to fill up the
silence with your speech and that’s what
I was trying to do in my outpatient
diabetes education. So I have learned
just to do this (SIT IN SILENCE) and have the client
that I’m dealing with talk and talk. You’re
able to pick up certain things as they talk.
Active listening is something
that I did not learn during my dietetic internship.
The second thing and I did not
learn in my internship was actually how
to calculate TPN=total parenteral
nutrition, as well as tube feeds. Now during
that rotation I did have a certified
nutrition
support dietitian. She was as smart as a
whip! I will be like, let’s let’s give her
a name, I don’t want to say her name um
Sue! “Sue so slow down, you’re losing me.” and
then Sue would be like : “Okay, all right
let’s do this again let’s take it from
the top Bam Bam Bam Bam.” And to be honest
with you, it didn’t make sense to me at all!
Because again, I think that rotation was
only 2 weeks and I had to learn TPNs
and tube feedings at the same time. We
had the computer there you just plug in
your numbers and it gave you everything,
but she wanted us to do it (the calculations) by with my hand and
I did not know how to do my hand until I
actually became a dietitian. I didn’t
fully grasp it chew it up, swallow it,
digest and assimilate it into my being.
So I didn’t understand that clinical.
When I actually started working like “OH!
this is what Sue meant; oh this is easy.” I
would pull out my calculator I’m like “oh
ok Bam Bam Bam Bam”. Tube feeding rates
going to be 50 and you’re going to flush
with 150 ml of water every six hours and
they’re going to titrate up by 10
milliliters every six to eight hours for
tolerance until the max goal rate of dadada
that is reached. So I was pretty
confident when I actually started
working and this is something that helped
me my R.D. exam because I actually started
working before I actually took my
R.D. exam I was R.D. eligible. TPNs
the same thing! The doctor would say “Oh Kim
I’m starting a patient on a TPN of
sixty four millimeters
and have fifty percent dextrose and
ten percent aminosyn with twenty
percentages lipids every Monday, Wednesday and
Friday. How many calories and protein does
this provide?” If you had asked me that as
a dietetic intern… I would have been like
“REALLY??”, but now I know how to do it by
hand. Third thing that I did not know how
to do his paper chart. ‘Kim what do you
mean my paper chart?’ During my internship
everything was electronical. All your
charting with computerized. Now where I’m
working we do not have a computer-based
charting system. Everything is done with
your hands and with a pen. Not a blue pen
I use a black pen. When you used to typing and
then when you actually have to take the
pen top off and then search through the
chart and just start writing: CARPAL
TUNNEL. (Laughing) I don’t have carpal tunnel, but
I’ll be honest with you, there are a few
times I thought I had carpal tunnel
based on how my hand was cramping up. Imagine seeing 20 to 25 patients a day and
you’re just documenting, your documenting,
your documenting. I did not know how to
paper chart and also with the whole
entire paper charting this has helped me
to learn how to figure out my TPNs and my
tube feedings by hand. Another thing that I
did not learn, it never dawned on me how
important the interdisciplinary team is.
Having your physical therapist, having
your pharmacist, having your social
worker, having your nurse, having your
doctor and rounding with them on a daily
basis. Patient-centered care how
important that is. We do do that during
my internship and I just thought well
“okay?!” Like it didn’t click, this up here
it wasn’t clicking until I actually
started working in the field and I
realized how each of us even though
we’re different disciplines, how it all
becomes integrated
when you’re dealing with a patient. So
guys, these are just a few things that I
did not learn during my dietetic
internship. I actually learned it in the
real world, in the workforce. So thank
you guys for watching any dietitians out
there please tell me below what you did
not learn during your internship what
you actually learned being a registered
and licensed dietitian. For any student
out there, anyone finishing their
internship, anyone planning on going into
the field of nutrition and dietetics, if
you have any questions don’t hesitate to
leave them below. As usual remember to
subscribe. Thank you guys for watching
B-Y-E!
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