Sugar and Cancer

Sugar and Cancer

July 21, 2019 13 By William Morgan


[MUSIC PLAYING] Scientists believe
2/3 of all cancers are caused by our
own bad choices like smoking and not exercising,
and the granddaddy of them all, a poor diet. Because what you eat
can literally kill you. Our CBN News health
reporter Lorie Johnson tells us about the dramatic
link between cancer and sugar. LORIE JOHNSON: A
clear relationship between sugar and cancer leads
scientists to two conclusions– sugar use contributes to
cancer, and going without it can slow the growth
of the disease. 100 years ago, most folks
consumed only four pounds of sugar a year. That’s this much. Now, however, the average person
takes in 40 times this amount, 160 pounds of sugar a year. That’s this much. Food manufacturers add
enormous amounts of sugar, usually in the form of
high fructose corn syrup, to products we consume
all day, every day. Coffee drinks and
cereal, soda and snacks, even foods you wouldn’t expect,
like spaghetti sauce and peanut butter. This tiny container of
yogurt contains more sugar than a candy bar. Now, scientists tell
us sugar directly influences cancer cells. The amount we consume can
either feed those cells or starve them. In a landmark study, researchers
at UTMD Anderson Cancer Center fed mice high
fructose corn syrup in percentages equal to
what many humans consume. Those mice developed
higher rates of lung and breast
cancer, compared to mice fed less sugar. The study also tells us
something about people who already have cancer. One researcher said,
“A lot of patients are told it doesn’t matter
what you eat after you are diagnosed with cancer. This preliminary animal research
suggests that it does matter.” And it just
absolutely amazes me that medical science is
just now finding this out. LORIE JOHNSON: Fred
Hatfield knows firsthand, sugar intake matters
after a cancer diagnosis. Back in 2012, his diagnosis
was basically a death sentence. The doctors gave
me three months to live, because of
widespread metastatic cancer in my skeletal structure. Three months. Three different doctors
told me that same thing. It’s a horrible,
horrible feeling to have someone tell you that
the person that you love only has three months to
live, and you’re not going to be with him anymore. LORIE JOHNSON: Then Fred
heard about a low sugar diet, called the ketogenic
diet, believed to slow cancer in some people. With nothing to lose, he gave it
a try, and to his astonishment, it worked. And the cancer was
gone, completely. LORIE JOHNSON: Fred’s recovery
didn’t surprise Dr. Dominique D’agostino. His team at the University
of South Florida discovered mice with highly
aggressive metastatic cancer continued living when
fed a ketogenic diet. We had dramatically
increased survival with metabolic
therapy, so we think it’s important to get
this information out. LORIE JOHNSON: And it’s
not just lab animals. Dr. D’agostino has seen
similar results in humans. I’ve been in correspondence
with a number of people, probably at least
a dozen people, and over the last year and a
half to two years, all of them are still alive,
despite the odds. So this is very encouraging. LORIE JOHNSON:
The ketogenic diet means no sugar and no
starchy carbohydrates like bread and pasta
that convert to sugar. D’agostino says cancer
cells love sugar and starch, because cancer thrives on
the glucose from those foods. Remove the glucose and
starve the cancer cells. Glucose also fuels our healthy
cells, but if it’s not there, those cells can switch
to an alternate fuel source called ketone bodies. Cancer cells only
run on glucose. Your normal cells have
the metabolic flexibility to adapt from using glucose
to using ketone bodies, but cancer cells lack this
metabolic flexibility, so we can exploit that. LORIE JOHNSON: Since processed
food contains so much sugar and starch, people
following the ketogenic diet tend to cook whole
foods from scratch. You can go online, and
there’s just cookbooks and, you know–
it’s clean eating. Just a very clean eating. None of the sugars, the
salts, the trash food. LORIE JOHNSON: So when
it comes to cancer, sugar is considered
public enemy number one. Avoiding it could
lead to prevention, or slow it down in people
fighting the disease. Lorie Johnson, CBN News. And our health guru
Lorie Johnson joins us now to talk a bit more about the
link between sugar and cancer. Wow, fascinating
piece, that that guy– he said cancer was
completely gone. So it is possible
for some people to overcome cancer by just
giving up the sugars– Absolutely. And you quoted a
study in the piece. Are there any other
scientific evidences that this is the case? There are, as a matter of fact. Aside from the study quoted
in the videotaped piece we just watched, also a group
of Australian researchers concluded high levels
of insulin, which is released when you eat sugar,
can cause breast, prostate, endometrial, and
pancreatic cancer. So whether you’re interested in
preventing cancer or reversing it, just remember
three key words. Sugar feeds cancer. That’s– you know, well,
it’s good that we know that, but it’s kind of like, do I have
to give up all the good stuff? Because really, that’s
what you’re saying. It’s the weakness. Sugar is the weakness
that feeds the cancer. That’s right, and it’s
great that we can exploit, that we know that cancer
cells thrive on sugar. As a matter of
fact, cancer cells uptake sugar 10 times
more than regular cells. But the real secret
is, cancer cells only have glucose receptors, whereas
regular cells have both glucose and ketone receptors. So we can literally
starve cancer cells by depriving them of
sugar, and our other cells will be just fine. Well, we know it means giving
up the cupcakes and the soda pop, but what about the
hidden sugars like yogurt? I avoid most yogurts, because
there’s just so much sugar. Right, I’m glad you
mentioned yogurt. I actually brought
a yogurt with me. And this looks, to most people,
like a really healthy choice. It’s nonfat, it’s Greek yogurt. This particular yogurt contains
five teaspoons of sugar. Look how little it is. The way you know how much
added sugar is in a product, look, it will tell
you on the label. And this is in grams. It says 20 grams of sugar. And a lot of people are
thinking, what’s a gram? I don’t know what that is. There are four grams
to every teaspoon, so if you have 20
grams of sugar, then you know that that’s
five teaspoons, so four grams equals one teaspoon. And I don’t even
think that tastes good. To me, it’s like, that’s
too sweet, you know? But the American palate,
that’s how they market it. A lot of folks love yogurt,
and it is good in some cases. The best way to choose
it is the plain yogurt, the Greek is good, and
then just add berries to it to sweeten it. You know, hidden sugar is
in most processed foods. One of our producers, Andrea
Garrett, your friend and mine, she was just at
home cooking and she happened to look at
the list of ingredients on this seasoned pepper,
and there is added sugar in the seasoned pepper. And really, this is consistent
with a lot of low salt or salt-free
seasonings or foods, because when you take out the
salt, you lose a lot of flavor and so manufacturers add flavor
back by adding sugar to it. Same thing with
low fat products. If you take out the
fat, then you’re losing a lot of the flavor,
so the manufacturers add sugar back into it. As an example, look at
these two cream cheeses. The full fat cream
cheese, and then there is the low fat version. The low fat version has twice– WENDY GRIFFITH: No way. –as much sugar. WENDY GRIFFITH: Give
me the fat any day. I know. WENDY GRIFFITH: And you know,
you and I were always saying, before it was cool, to
say– we were saying, fat is your friend, sugar is your foe. And then all these
studies came out. So we really started this trend. We’ll take credit for it. But you know what was
shocking in the piece that you just did, was
that 100 years ago, one bag of Domino’s
sugar, one bag was what they would
have in a year, and now we have like
16 of those a year. Right. 100 years ago,
people only ate cake when it was someone’s
birthday, and on those tiny little plates. And now we have it every day. It’s really crept up. We know that there’s
a lot of– just these two pieces of white
bread contain almost an entire teaspoon of sugar. So, yeah, look at the labels. You look at the labels
and the first ingredient is flour, and then
the ingredient right after that is sugar. And, too, a lot
of the fast foods, they put sugar in
their French fries. They put sugar in their
bread, because they know sugar’s addictive. LORIE JOHNSON: Yeah. Sugar is a drug. LORIE JOHNSON: It makes
everything taste better. I mean, I guess it’s
not a drug, exactly, but it acts like a drug
because it’s very addictive. Absolutely, yeah, no doubt. So consider when you’re eating,
when you’re choosing products at the store, stay away from
the refined carbohydrates. Refined carbohydrates are
the white flour products, like bread, bagels, the flour
tortillas, and the reason those are bad is
because the fiber has been removed almost entirely,
or at least partially. WENDY GRIFFITH: So you’re
a fan of whole wheat bread. If you want to eat grains,
then definitely choose the whole grains, and fruits and
vegetables are carbohydrates, but they have the fiber. But there are high sugar
fruits and vegetables. The low sugar ones are the
ones you should choose. If you’re really trying
to watch your sugar, berries are the
low sugar fruits, things like apples and
bananas are really high. And most vegetables
are low in sugar, although white potatoes and
corn and peas and carrots are kind of high. WENDY GRIFFITH: I did something
last night that you do, that I have not
done in a long time. I made my own salad
dressing, and I put a big hunk of raw garlic,
some ginger, olive oil, and the apple cider
vinegar, and a little bit of pepper, dash of salt,
and it was interesting. It was pretty– kind of thick,
but boy, do I feel good today. There is something very
potent about that garlic and the ginger and all those
things that– and olive oil. That sounds really good. But I sit right
next to Lorie, so I can’t get away with anything. [LAUGHTER] LORIE JOHNSON: I’m like the
food cop of the newsroom. She is the food police. When people have their junk
food and they see me coming, they sort of run in
the other direction, because I’ll be
wagging my finger. Don’t eat that! We do appreciate it. You’re going to help us
all live a lot longer. So Lori, thank you, and if you
would like more information on the links between
sugar and cancer, you can get it by logging
on to cbnnews.com. Lorie, thanks. LORIE JOHNSON: It’s my pleasure.