[Preview] Learning about ketosis through evolutionary studies

[Preview] Learning about ketosis through evolutionary studies

November 6, 2019 7 By William Morgan


The foundation of much
of our biochemical understanding of ketosis
comes from experience
in fasted humans and animals.
Particularly the work of George Cahill
has been very influential.
He recently or relatively recently
published a paper called Starvation in Man,
which I’ll be using some graphics from
and that goes over a lot of his career
and some of his more current thoughts
on the issues.
The problem that that kind of origin
carries with it is an implicit warning
because obviously starvation
is not recommended.
It’s not sustainable indefinitely,
it’s stressful to the body and it can have
harms that are sometimes irreversible.
As you know even shorter-term fasts
are controversial among experts,
even among us
and the concerns come down
to potential damage to lean mass
and all of the potential dangers
of protein and calorie malnutrition.
And so if ketosis is like fasting,
then it sounds like if we’re going to use it,
we’d better use it judiciously and sparingly.