PMS Fighting Foods (Extended Edition) (HD) (CC)

PMS Fighting Foods (Extended Edition) (HD) (CC)

July 30, 2019 1 By William Morgan


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PMS—likely the reason our monthly visitor
was nicknamed “the curse” –
may be easier to cure than previously thought.
Though it will require a certain amount of
discipline on your part,
the most effective cure for PMS appears to be dietary.
To give you a head-start, I have compiled
a short list of the foods highest in more
than one the vitamins and minerals most effective
against PMS.
I call these foods “twofers,” though some
contain three of the PMS fighting nutrients.
Cooked spinach
Cooked Black beans
Peanuts
Whole wheat bread
Raw broccoli
Salmon
Sardines
Halibut, fillet
There are many more foods that naturally contain the minerals magnesium and calcium,
and the vitamins B6 and D,
but these eight will give you the most bang
for your calorie buck.
If such foods are eaten regularly, while avoiding
the substances that cause or exacerbate PMS,
you can decrease and even eliminate PMS symptoms.
Magnesium is essential to optimal functioning of the human nervous system,
which is why it’s also known as the “anti-stress mineral.”
It regulates calcium in the body, and acts
as a natural muscle relaxant.
In the early 20th century, before the pharmaceutical industry funded medical schools,
magnesium was used by doctors to induce sleep, treat epileptic seizures,
control convulsions, and “the shakes”
in alcoholics.
So, it’s no surprise that various studies
have verified magnesium’s ability to help
relieve the most troubling PMS symptoms.
These symptoms include
menstrual cramps, muscle cramps
mood swings, irritability
depression, anxiety
bloating, fluid retention
breast tenderness
sugar cravings
headaches, migraines
sleeplessness / insomnia
and constipation
A number of studies have demonstrated that
using magnesium
with vitamin B6 significantly decreases PMS
symptoms.
Several studies have also shown that magnesium could positively influence anxiety and depression symptoms,
as well as nausea and constipation.
According to the National Institutes of Health, adult women need between 320 and 400mg of Magnesium each day.
A number of studies have shown that 1,000
to 1,200mg of calcium per day
could significantly reduce levels of fatigue,
appetite changes and depression,
in women suffering from PMS.
Of all the supplements studied for effectiveness
in treating PMS,
calcium is second only to magnesium, as far as scientific evidence backing up anecdotal accounts.
Vitamin B6 is essential to many bodily functions, because metabolism,
immune response and nervous system functioning all depend on it.
Vitamin B6 is necessary for the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system,
the removal of homocysteine from the blood,
the synthesis of hemoglobin in red blood cells,
and optimal immune system functioning.
For all of these reasons and more,
vitamin B6, in concert with magnesium, can
significantly decrease PMS symptoms.
Vitamin D eases PMS symptoms, in part,
because it helps the body absorb and utilize
calcium.
In addition,
“vitamin D regulates expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (a rate-limiting enzyme), which
in turn controls dopamine,
epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), and norepinephrine.
These are brain chemicals that control mood and motivation, as well survival responses.”
According to a study published in Archives of Internal Medicine,
blood levels of calcium and vitamin D are
lower in women with PMS,
but supplementing can reduce the severity of PMS symptoms.
However, it as yet unknown whether or not nutrition can prevent the initial development of PMS.
Fast foods and processed foods contain a lot of sodium, even the ones that don’t taste salty.
And too much sodium (salt) can make PMS symptoms worse, particularly bloating.
The same goes for fats from meats.
Meat fat contains arachidonic acid, which
produces prostaglandins that can cause uterine
contractions and cramping.
Trans fats (hydrogenated oils) should also be avoided.
They cause inflammation in the body and can intensify your pain.
Both of these fats should be avoided during the last few days before the onset of your period.
Caffeine is also a no no.
It has been linked to breast tenderness and
anxiety in premenstrual women.
If you’re considering solving your PMS issues with supplements and retaining bad eating habits,
keep in mind, it’s not just the individual
nutrients that are effective for fighting PMS.
Whole foods that are loaded with fiber, are low on the glycemic index, and contain
complex carbohydrates, are a must for fighting PMS symptoms as well.
This is especially true for mood swings and depression.
Such foods have demonstrated their ability to boost serotonin levels in the brain.
And serotonin is the neurotransmitter responsible for controlling mood balance.
Oatmeal, brown rice, lentils, quinoa, butternut squash, apples and pears (with skin), strawberries,
almonds and walnuts are all excellent examples.
Remember, selecting foods with both taste and nutrition in mind will prevent you from
returning to old, unproductive eating habits.
Do your research; it will be well worth it.
You may even discover some twofers that I’ve missed, and you’ll not only be combating “the curse”
but living a much healthier, contented life.
This video is based on the updated and expanded article “PMS Fighting Foods”,
the link is in the description box below.
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