PCOS/Insulin Resistance Diet Success | Low GI | Not Keto | PCOS 101 – Part 2 [CC]

PCOS/Insulin Resistance Diet Success | Low GI | Not Keto | PCOS 101 – Part 2 [CC]

July 26, 2019 7 By William Morgan


Hi guys and welcome back to IRL JAKS where
I talk about my real life as it happens and
bring you along for the ride.
Today, I’m going to be continuing my Polycystic
Ovarian Syndrome series where I talk about
polycystic ovarian syndrome and tell you everything
you need to know about diet, exercise and
getting pregnant with PCOS.
Today, we’re going to be talking about diet
and what the ‘do’s and don’ts’ are of
dieting and picking a good lifestyle as far
as your food goes when you have polycystic
ovarian syndrome.
We have to back up a little bit, because it’s
really important to understand insulin and
insulin resistance when we’re talking about
a proper diet with polycystic ovarian syndrome,
since most women with polycystic ovarian syndrome
also have some degree of insulin resistance.
Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas.
When you have high levels of blood sugar in
your bloodstream, the pancreas produces insulin.
It acts as a key to let sugar or glucose into
your cells and provide energy for your cells.
Insulin resistance is when those keys don’t
fit into the locks anymore and your cell rejects
the insulin and the sugar back out into your
bloodstream.
This prevents you from burning fat in an effective
manner and it also stresses out your pancreas
who’s going to rush to produce more insulin.
It also increases your risk of type 2 diabetes.
Before making this video, I consulted with
a gynecologist, a reproductive endocrinologist
and nutritionist, as well as the internet,
as well as several books before I came up
with what the best diet for polycystic ovarian
syndrome sufferers is.
And all of my research and all of my talks
have led me to believe that a low glycemic
index diet is the best.
A low glycemic index or a low GI diet is one
where the carbohydrates that you consume breakdown
slowly; which allows your blood stream to
have a steady level of blood sugar instead
of it spiking up and down and causing your
body to produce large amounts of insulin and
process it all within a short amount of time.
It’s important to note that only foods that
contain carbs affect your blood sugar.
This is glucose, fructose and galactose.
So, that’s your normal sugar; sugar from fruit
and then your sugars from milk.
A large amount of easing PCOS symptoms is
trying to manage the symptoms that come along
with insulin resistance.
With that in mind and the goal to create a
low glycemic index diet or lifestyle, here’s
the tools that you need to succeed.
First, you need a good GI index website.
I have linked a few of my favorites down in
the description box below for you to check
out.
It’s more important just to familiarize yourself
with things that have a high GI rating over
something that has a low GI index, so that
you can start making smarter choices about
what you eat and start making smarter substitutions.
Next, I highly recommend making a meal plan.
Accidents happen when you don’t have a meal
plan.
When in a 6 o’clock and you’re tired from
work and there’s nothing ready for you at
home to make, you stop by Taco Ball; it happens.
Next, I suggest reducing caffeine.
Caffeine interferes with your body’s ability
to process blood sugar effectively.
Caffeine fools the body into thinking it has
enough sugar when it doesn’t and when the
caffeine wears off, your body panics, because
that thinks it’s been fueling all these cells
with glucose and really, it’s just been a
false high from the caffeine.
It causes your body to panic and then tell
you to eat more things to get your blood sugar
up and it also puts your body into overdrive,
transforming fat back into glucose in the
short term, which of course, we don’t want
to spike our blood sugar, we want to keep
it steady.
So, this isn’t the desired effect.
Obviously, if I’m telling you to reduce your
caffeine, I have to tell you to get good regular
sleep.
That means eight hours, dedicated to sleeping
every day; which I know is a lot for most
people, but it’s really critical in balancing
out your body and keeping you from turning
back to caffeine for energy or snacking on
sugary things to keep your energy up.
Now, I’m not going to get into the specifics
of different foods in their glycemic index.
I wanted to touch on one area in particular
that I think we all tend to indulge a little
bit in and that’s our alcohol consumption.
When it comes to happy hour and a low glycemic
index, wine is your best bet.
It’s the lowest glycemic index, as far as
your alcohol choices go and it’ll keep you
from totally wrecking your glycemic index
rating for the day.
So, for women with PCOS, there’s an extra
challenge in dealing with your diet and it’s
that your hormones often affect how well you
feel, as far as your energy levels and your
cravings.
While there’s not anything you can particularly
do about this, it’s important to remember
it and keep it in mind as you face the challenges
of switching up your diet.
I don’t really like the term ‘diet’ and
I prefer a lifestyle, because you’re going
to have polycystic ovarian syndrome for the
rest of your life and just going on a diet
isn’t going to cut it.
You’re going to need to change your lifestyle
to make a real change and that means making
very small incremental changes that you can
sustain for long-term.
Long-term being the rest of your life.
So, that being said, we don’t want to cause
any rebounds or crashes coming off of sugar
or caffeine.
So, when you make these changes, do them slowly.
If you’re used to six cups of coffee a day,
do not go cold turkey.
You will eventually turn back to caffeine.
Instead, reduce it about one cup every week
or two, so that your body gets used to it
and you don’t fill your cravings for caffeine
or sugar with something else.
The same rule applies to everything else in
your life.
If you’re used to eating white pasta and bread,
don’t try to substitute with a lettuce wrap
in week one.
You’re not going to like it and your body’s
going to revolt against you, as well as your
mind.
When you’re making these incremental changes,
it applies to the rest of your diet as well.
For instance, for pasta, if you’re starting
with white flour based pasta, the next step
down to a healthier thing would be 100% whole
grain pasta and from there, you could go to
premade spinach based pasta and from there,
if you want to go all the way to the other
into the spectrum, you could do freshly spiralized
zucchini pasta.
But anywhere you stop on that gradient, you’ve
made a healthier change and that’s the goal.
To keep stepping down, one thing at a time,
healthier, healthier, until you’ve hit the
wall and you’re like, “Okay, this is as
far as I can go.
I can’t make it to spinach pasta, but I can
do 100% whole grain pasta” and that’s still
better from where you where before, then move
on to the next thing and the next thing and
the next thing.
And make sure you do it in small incremental
changes, so that it’s sustainable.
Again, this is your lifestyle, not a diet
keep it simple and keep it steady.
When I was doing my research and talking to
different professionals, there was a few diets
that they told me to strictly avoid.
These diets that they told me to avoid were
high fat, high protein and keto-based diets.
Shifting your diet to extremes, like high
fat or high protein, stresses out different
organs in your body that now have to work
overtime to process all of that material.
And again, it’s a diet instead of a lifestyle.
Specifically, my reproductive endocrinologist
or my fertility doctor cautioned against keto
because it’s very dangerous during pregnancy.
High keto levels in the blood stream have
damaging effects on fetuses.
High ketogens lead to nausea and subsequent
loss of appetite; which again is going to
cause the feeling of being too hungry or not
hungry enough and spike your blood sugar since
you’re not having a steady intake of food.
There’s been no data supporting low carb or
high fat or all organic or keto diets in relation
to positively affecting PCOS.
On the flip side, there have been plenty of
studies on the positive effects of a low glycemic
index diet on you blood sugar.
Granted, most of these were in relation to
diabetes, but since insulin resistance and
by diabetes are so closely related, most of
the doctors that I talked to took these into
account when getting their recommendation
for the diet that someone with PCOS should
go on.
I hope you found this video helpful and if
you’re interested in learning more about PCOS,
check out the other videos in this series.
And if you’re interested in finding out more
about my own personal story with PCOS, infertility,
pregnancy and miscarriage, go ahead and check
out the other videos on my channel.
If you like the content in this video and
you’d like me to continue making more, please
give this video a ‘Like’.
Thanks for watching and until next time, keep
on fighting.