Paul’s Story – Macmillan Cancer Support

Paul’s Story – Macmillan Cancer Support

November 4, 2019 0 By William Morgan


My name’s Paul Vose. I was diagnosed in 2006
with quite an aggressive cancer.
Cancer of the tonsils.
When you’re told you’ve got cancer, it’s
that shock.
I never thought it was gonna kill me
but I still remember now, telling your parents
that you’ve got cancer.
It was a very, very rapid journey for me.
Literally, I went on holiday, had some tests,
came back,
told I had cancer and was in hospital practically
straight away.
It’s quite a torturous and quite a nasty treatment
really.
So they literally bolt me to the bed there.
That mask, they’d put over your face
you’re just locked solid.
And then the scanner literally goes over you
and fires beams in from there.
It became very painful at the end because,
you see, all the burns I had
but again, I don’t know, you get used to it,
don’t you.
The Macmillan team were there to help me,
sort of all the way through my journey.
Knowing they were there gave me that confidence
to rely on the medical team.
I first met Catherine when she did discuss
putting the PEG tube in and how it was going
to help me
I reacted very badly to the chemotherapy in
that my throat blistered up very, very quickly
and burnt.
The reason Paul was having a feeding tube
fitted,
was because we knew the side effects would
be quite serve
and he’d need a feeding tube to help him with
his nutrition.
You’re told about how bad it’s going to be
but you consciously block that out I think.
So by Christmas 2006, that was the last meal
I ever had.
Initially when it was put in, they were just
telling us how to clean it and look after
it.
Then Catherine started coming to the house
make sure I was having the right diet and
was getting the right food.
Things like that.
So I have two bottles of food. One at lunchtime
and one in the evening
Just to tie in with Jane’s meal time so we
can eat together.
Or feed together as I call it.
People say, “Do you miss eating?”.
And I think ‘cause I went to such a bad
place and I was so ill
eating actually was irrelevant.
You just wanted to survive and get better.
I was just grateful to be alive coming out
the other end.
The support I got from Catherine and the rest
of the team was just absolutely fantastic.
I think my catchers were my support. That
was Macmillan.
It was almost like I’ve got to give something
back, to say thank you.
And it was just a friend doing the Great North
Run and I thought
let’s just go for it.
People just get behind you so much.
You just see all the green and you’ve got
little clappers from Macmillan and everything.
It was really fantastic.
I’m just wondering what challenge Paul’s gonna
set next.
It is just a fantastic support mechanism.
It would be a completely different cancer
service without Macmillan.
It just made that huge difference.
Without the help from Catherine and the Macmillan
team around I wouldn’t have stood a chance.