Log Finnish Sauna | Pemmican Recipe | Cabin Life | Canadian Wilderness

Log Finnish Sauna | Pemmican Recipe | Cabin Life | Canadian Wilderness

August 4, 2019 100 By William Morgan


(log crunching) (wind howling) (instrumental country music) (tarp rustling) (footsteps crunching) (logs crunching and thudding) (tarp crunching) (log thudding) (logs crunching and thudding) (metal scraping) (log crunching and thudding) (pencil scraping) (hammer thudding) (saw scraping) (hammer thudding) (chisel scraping) (log scraping) (log thuds) (metal scraping) – What’s up? Can you sit? It’s quiet out here today. No wind, just birds. (metal scraping) (hammer thudding) (logs thudding) It’s funny how your perspective changes. Remember a few weeks
ago I recorded a video talking about what I would
change about the cabin. Whether I would put an air lock on here, and facing the orient
in the cabin more south. South-facing so the broader
side is facing south. But you just get used to it. So as much as I observed that, that maybe I would make that change, it’s not like I really care too much. Because like I said, my
perspective has changed. How I deal with cold
is completely different than how I dealt with
cold when I lived in town in a bigger, warmer house, and rarely ventured outside. So when I did, like if
I went down to the city for work for example, or to the nearby, the nearby town where I had my business, dressed in business attire
everything felt cold. So this is minus five right now. Actually it’s a lot of humidity because you can feel
the dampness in the air. But at that time, minus
five felt brutally cold because I would have light boots on, a light winter dressier coat, and a suit or at least dress clothes. Just not prepared for it. No hat, so everything felt cold. Then when you start living
basically outside full time minus five is balmy. Like, no gloves, no hat, probably take the jacket off
if I start splitting wood. Take the coat off. And what I talked about
with the air coming in I don’t even care because this cabin heats up so fast, once it’s warm with that wood stove burning that it’s almost refreshing to have that cold air come in briefly
and then close the door, let the fire heat everything back up again within short time and not care about it. But the other thing is I
always have more clothes on, or more prepared, more dressed for it, than if I was, like I
said, living more urban. So got proper boots on, thicker pants, these down vests are awesome,
just undo it when I get hot, or take it off and then put it back on. Keeps my core warm. So just something you get used to. Like I said, minus five
feels warm right now. So that’s why I’m kind
of leaving the door open, I don’t really care. Load up with more firewood and then I gotta get
back working on the sauna and splitting a little bit more firewood before making dinner. Actually, if you want to stick around until later in the video I’m actually gonna make pemmican with that lard that I rendered, that tallow that I rendered two weeks ago. And then the jerky that
I dried on the fire, the deer jerky. Gonna mix that all
together with a little bit of blueberries, and I’ll show you what the end product looks like. (logs thudding) (footsteps crunching) (door creaking) (match scrapes) Wanna come in, come on in? (log thudding) (metal scraping) (sizzling) You hungry pup? (sizzling) (lettuce popping) (metal tapping) (meat sizzling) (fish sizzling) (wood scraping) (metal clanging) Tired again, Cali is exhausted. We went for a quick
walk around the property just before dinner time. Without, I didn’t wear snowshoes, of course she doesn’t wear snowshoes. But she was having a hard time walking through the snow, I can’t believe how deep it’s getting. We haven’t had snow for
almost a week, I think, like significant snow, since, oh. Did it snow in the last video? Yeah, I think it snowed
in the last video, right. But we haven’t had anything
in at least three days anyway. And today we got a little
bit of freezing rain, so kind of compressed
it a little bit again, but still it’s probably, well it was up over my knees everywhere, and then the odd spot where vegetation was holding the snow up off the ground it went up to my waist a couple of times. So Cali was kind of
struggling through that. And I took her for a walk specifically to tire her out because she was restless and she couldn’t find either
one of her training dummies. They’re out in the snow here somewhere. So we’re gonna have to try
to find those tomorrow. While I’m sitting here though I’ll start opening some mail. I haven’t been getting to
the P.O. box very often. So this stuff I picked up since the last video where I actually showed me
opening mail from subscribers. And there’s still
Christmas stuff in there, still Christmas cards and stuff, so. I’ll go through that quickly,
I’ll open this stuff up. Thank you everybody again. Two pillows like that, and
they’re a fair size too. And they’re actually
perfect for the cabin. I do like having red accents in here, and so does my wife. And they’re quite large
so that bench that I built which is a bench for the kitchen table as well as a spare bed, it’s so deep because it is a bed as well, that you need a bunch of
pillows for your back. So that’s perfect, I appreciate
that thank you very much. This is not in any order. I already opened all this stuff so I’m just looking at it again quickly. Somebody with a 3D printer
printed all these things off. They’re all merry Christmas, so these are Christmas decorations printed on a 3D printer. But a couple of loose items were little cast iron looking frying
pans, which is pretty neat. Cali, none of this is
actually for you, pup. There’s no food in that frying pan. (chuckles) That’s not for
you, no, no, no, no, no, no. Come on, back to bed. Merry Christmas from Chuck Miller. Thank you, Chuck. Kat’s Arts and Crafts, is it? Patrick Delsing in the
Netherlands, actually. Patrick and his family sent me this. Cali, pup, what are you doing? Hey, what are you doing,
what are you doing? None of it’s for you. Well maybe, maybe there
is food in there for you. We’ll find out in a minute. Patrick carved, this is an open L knife. I think it’s a standard
knife that you buy, but anyway, he carved the handle. So there’s a little bear head
on the end of this handle which is very cool, very creative. And it’s done very well, and it’s a knife that I can actually use. And it’s really sharp. I’ll probably use this
actually for opening mail. Cali, what the heck are you doing, girl? No, you’re not biting
that, what are you doing? Not for you. I’m not sure why she’s doing that. Card from the Woods online, on YouTube, the Woods online, Brian and Angie. Thank you, I’ll check out your channel. This is a bar of charcoal soap, I believe. Yup, gears layer charcoal
soap, that’s cool. And that is from Palmer
Nine Handcrafted Soaps, Ali Slocum. You can always use soaps,
especially natural soaps. I have a few bars like this that have been given to
me from different people, including one of our
friends who makes them. But that’s my favorite,
that’s all I use here is these natural soaps,
I really appreciate that. This is from Jefferey Skillet Sheaman, Chanhassen, Minnesota, near Minneapolis. It says merry Christmas, happy new year. I’ll read all these letters, by the way, and I have read some of them already. But I’m not gonna read them online, or on here, on the video. But that’s a, what’s it say. My wife knew what it is. Called pastry knife, for cutting butter or lard, I guess, for making
bread and pastries and stuff. So that definitely will get used, that will go into the kitchen
right away, thank you. Romney’s Kendal Mint Cake. A whole box of these things, this is like, literally like three, four
pounds of this mint cake. If you want to speak up in the comments just let me know exactly who it was, I’ve lost the envelope that it came in. Oh, this came in this, I guess. I’m not sure if there
was a letter with this, I’ve misplaced it if there is. I’m assuming you sent Joe Robinette these a year and a half ago
as well, two years ago. If that’s the case, then
I actually tried it, and I’m pretty sure this is the
same stuff at the very least but I did try it on our
woodland caribou canoe trip. And it was nice on like day
six, or seven, or eight, or whatever it was to
have a treat like that. High density sugar treat. I’m not gonna eat that right now because I’m kind of in ketosis
right now for the winter, but definitely that’s
going to be something I’m gonna keep in my survival pack and in my skidoo pack
and also I’ll take that on canoe trips, nice to eat that sitting around the fire at night. Or if I’m I portaging or
something, high energy stuff, I can just quickly take a bite of that. So thank you, really,
really appreciate that. I’ve misplaced the letter
or whatever or card that came along with
this, so sorry about that. But if you want to comment below, please let me know that it
was you that sent me these. Really appreciate that, like
I said it’s perfect for here. So another thing that
just arrived was a knife from Survival Lilly. It’s a knife that she
designed and had made. She went through quite a number of designs, actually, til she finally got the one that she’s satisfied with. I don’t know the specs on this nice knife, specifically right now. I think, Lilly, if you
want to comment below, I’ll pin your comment for a while and let people see what exactly this is. I’m going to spend some
time using this thing, then I’ll do a review, I think, later. Where I’ll talk about it more and I’ll talk about the specs. All I can see right now is
it’s very, very thick steel. Extremely sharp spine. Nice handle. I like that blade shape, actually. It’s kind of the blade
shape that I prefer. I use that more than anything for, especially for big game hunting. So I do like that design. I like the heft of this thing too, and it’s a really solid
case, too, that it’s in. I guess that’s a Kydex
sheath with all kinds of grommets and screws
to hold it together. Really well built and solid. I mean it’s in there good, right. Anyway, I like that knife a lot. Lilly, thanks a lot for that. And I’ll definitely, like I said, put that to good use and let you know exactly what I think about it. Soon, probably in the next week or two. Got a lot of things I could use that for this week even. So thanks Lilly, appreciate it. That whole thing’s always a
little bit awkward for me, especially going to the P.O. box or going into town to get the stuff and then coming out with
all this mail from you guys. I do appreciate it, but it,
like I said, it is awkward. Just unusual, I guess,
to get stuff from people that I don’t know. I’ll get used to it I guess, but like I said I do appreciate it. And seems like everytime in town now, uploading a video, I do run into people. And actually I stopped at Cabella’s yesterday I guess, when I was uploading, yeah, ’cause I was at the coffee shop right by Cabella’s uploading a video, and somebody who recognized
me came up to me there, which was nice. And then when I went to Cabella’s to get a piece for my auger, ice auger, somebody came and introduced
themselves there as well, which was nice. I’m gonna go to bed
early, ’cause that was… It wasn’t overly hard a day, but it’s gonna be much
colder, so, you know, I’ve got something I’m gonna make in here in the morning actually. That pot of beef shank and venison loin that’s simmering away on the stove, that’s actually tomorrow’s
lunch and tomorrow’s dinner. But I have something else I’m
gonna make in the morning, that pemmican, so if you want to watch the second half of the video that’s what I’ll be doing in it. Making that pemmican and then going out and working on the sauna. I didn’t realize, when
I got that fire going inside to thaw out those logs, it melted down to the
bare gravel, of course, and, uh, I wasn’t sure, I knew there was two courses down there but it didn’t really translate I guess. I was thinking I only had
six or seven courses done, but I actually have nine courses done. Which mean’s I’m four and a half feet up and I’m only going six feet, so I only need three or four more courses to get the walls, the outside wall, like the left and right long walls to the height that I’m
going to stop at, actually. I’m only a couple of days
away from having that done and then I can get that roof done and then I can start making doors. Like framing in the two doors and working on that center wall. That’s exciting, finally. So anyway, that’s in the morning. So I’m gonna shut this off, stop filming, and finish doing the dishes, and then I’m gonna go to bed early. So, see you in the morning. I don’t know if you can hear that wind. Just getting ready for
bed, and all of a sudden you could hear this
wind picking up, wicked. It was so calm all day, like
completely, completely calm, not even a breeze. (wind howling) That’s the cold front coming in. It was like, it got all
the way up to minus two just before I came in. I think it’s dropping down to
minus 20 or something tonight. Maybe not quite that low, but something, it’s a lot colder. So that’s the cold front blowing in. Cali, you want to go out
or you want to come in? (door creaking) (liquid gurgling) (chair creaking) (sizzling) Just uploaded my Wednesday video. It’s Wednesday morning right now. So this is my equivalent of
eating in front of the TV. Watching the fire and
responding to your comments on the video. (wind howling) That’s wicked out there. (wind howling) (metal grinding) (meat squelching) (metal clanging) (door creaking) Don’t touch it, want to
come in and lick the bowl? Come on, pup. (wind howling) (tarp rustling) (wind howling) (pencil scraping) (bird squawking) (log crunching and thudding) (metal scraping) Come on.
(door creaking) It’s getting cold in here, hey Cali? This is my lunch and my dinner. It’s the stuff I put on
the stove last night. The grass fed beef shank, a venison loin, and some ground venison from the previous night’s sort of chili. Then there’s celery and
tomatoes, that’s basically it. And some spices, but, that’s
the bulk of the ingredients. Oh, and I put that bok choy or pak choy or whatever it is, I put
those leaves in here as well. So it was a little bit of greenery. It’s getting very cold outside. So burning through calories
like crazy right now. And I think what I’m going to do, it’s getting pretty cold on the hands because of the wind. It’s not bad, even if
it’s minus 20 Celsius, like zeroish Fahrenheit, it’s not bad when the wind’s not blowing, but as soon as the wind picks up it just goes right through you when you’re stationary trying to work. So I think what I’ll do after lunch is go out and find the ridge pole, the ridge beam. I’m at that point now. I actually only have one and
a half courses left to go for the wall height, and then I’m going to
start making the gables. So I want to make sure that I have the proper ridge beam in stock here, like up alongside the cabin. So that I can get the dimension of it, the diameter, and then make sure that I cut the gable, top gable uprights, to the dimension that puts the ridge pole beam at the right point,
if you know what I mean. Anyway, I’ll be there, got a lot of other things on the go right now, but I’ll be there probably
in the next two weeks on video, I would say. Have the gable ends
done, then be putting up that ridge beam, so I need
to really find it now. Plus, I think the two top courses, I’m probably also going to make extra long so that I have an overhang
over the front door. So I really need either three or five, ideally five, ’cause I’m gonna
have a heavy roof on there. So it’d be nice to have an intermediary, intermediate beam here, so I’ve got ridge, middle, and top cord. I know where there’s one for sure, we’ll go look at it
right now, after lunch. And it’s ash, it’s a
lot stronger than cedar. Make a good one but it’s gonna be heavy, so probably have to get the snowmobile out and pull it up to the cabin. It’s been going on long enough since I put it on last night that it’s nice and tender now. That’s dinner again tonight,
probably lunch again tomorrow. So whenever I’m making
meals here I try to do that. I try to make kind of one pot meals or two pot meals that I try to make them last over at least two meals. Just let them simmer,
like even a stock pot, I’ll just put a pot on the stove and let vegetables and meat simmer to make a nice stew or a gravy or broth that I can cook other things in. Finding it cool too, pup? So these are some that I made last year with last year’s deer,
last year’s venison. With more tallow and more blueberries. You can see it’s a lot lighter, ’cause that’s the, obviously
the tallow, so the fat. These ones are more protein than fat. Probably still though,
I would say that’s still like 60% fat, about I would say at least 30% protein
and 10% carbohydrates. This is likely more like 80% fat, and uh, 10%, yeah probably, probably 70%, 20%, and 10%
or something like that. Or 5% carbohydrates. So that’s my basic recipe for pemmican. I think it’s pretty traditional. I use venison, some white tail deer, but in the past, like
back when the voyageurs, the coureurs des bois were using this as pretty much their sole food source. They made it out of buffalo,
it came from the prairies and worked its way back. So dried buffalo, buffalo fat, and then whatever berries, could be cranberries or in my case blueberries. And even that’s eliminated sometimes. Hard to believe that they
actually survived on that. It’s not the most palatable, but of course there’s
a lot of energy in it. What I didn’t realize until I started doing research into the ketogenic diet is that that’s basically what it was. So I’ve heard that back then it took them two or three weeks to get used to using that as a fuel source. And the reason for that is that there’s not enough carbohydrates in it to convert to glucose
to operate your brain to provide energy to the brain. So it takes awhile for
your body to get used to using ketones as your
primary energy source. So that’s why it would have taken them time to adjust to like
a 90% fat diet or 80%. So I tend to use it, I do
carry it in my survival pack and I have eaten it
just straight like that quite a few times, but I do prefer just to put it into a pot, melt it down and then
put something else in it just to thin it out a
little bit, dilute it a bit. Even if it’s cooking fish
or some other kind of meat or vegetables, that’s my
favorite way to use it. So, that’ll store virtually forever. I’ve had stuff two or three years old. So I’ll put this in a mason jar and keep it in the cellar
under the ground here and that’ll stay for a long time. (door creaking) (metal clanging) So a lot of herbal teas you have to, or herbal, however you say it, you have to simmer
gently or boil the water, let it cool down slightly, and then put the tea into it. Chaga is different, you actually boil it, or simmer it for a long time. Longer the better, actually. Actually unlocks the nutrients. So what I tend to do is I’ll
fill a kettle like that. And let it simmer on the
fire for a little while. Then just basically start drinking it soon as I feel like it. I don’t really wait too long
because what I end up doing is using my entire chaga, essentially what I let it
do is simmer for even days. And I’ll just keep drinking that, I’ll just keep topping
this kettle up with water as I drain it, as I drink it. And keep doing that until it runs clear, and then I’ll clean out the kettle. Get rid of that spent chaga, and put some new powder in there. Typically I like to get it smaller than what I just put in there, but it doesn’t matter
because it’s gonna leach for so long that I will get
all the nutrients out of it. So I’ve been finding all kinds of it. I have those three big chunks and I have probably a dozen other trees that I’ve found it on. So I’ve got pretty well
a lifetime supply of it. Proper way to harvest it is to, when you find a chunk on typically
a birch tree around here, a yellow birch and paper birch, is that you take a saw and cut it leaving at least a good
inch proud of the bark, like sticking further out than the bark, so that you’re not damaging the tree. Now the chaga will
eventually kill the tree, it could take years,
you don’t want to speed that process up and you
don’t want to kill the chaga. So by cutting it off like that both things survive longer. But you do want to
harvest it in the winter when the tree and the chaga are dormant. Trying to think of other
things that are like this. But basically, I guess a
lot of plants are like this. So in the summer all the
energy’s going up to the leaves and then in the winter or
the fall when it goes dormant the tops die off in a, say
an annual or bi-annual plant, bi-annual or perirenal. So the energy goes back into that bulb or into the root system
and then in the spring the energy comes back out of that and it flourishes again. Same thing with chaga. So in the fall, all the energy
comes back into the chaga and gets stored there
throughout the winter and then it starts flowing back
into the tree in the spring when the sap starts flowing again. So this is a good time to harvest it. I’ll harvest what I can for now. I might harvest a little bit more now, but this is probably enough already what I’ve got here for at
least a year, I would say. And those other trees I
just want to make sure I harvest it before the tree dies, and then the chaga dies as well. So I’ll put that on the fire and I’ll start drinking
that this afternoon. So we went through the subscriber mail and the gifts last night,
I forgot to mention this. This is from Gregory
Brian or Brian Gregory, I’m not sure how the waybill was made out. So I don’t think I saw a letter with it. I think where are you
from, North Carolina? You sent this all the way from down there. I think the shipping alone
on that was over $50. So appreciate you doing that for me, that’s really, really thoughtful on quite an expensive gift. If you don’t what it
is it, it’s a log dog. You’ve probably seen me use another one. It’s handy to have two,
especially with bigger logs. And also when I get into
making the timber frame workshop, woodshop, I’ll
definitely be needing two. So this is very much appreciated. I’ll show you how it works right now if you haven’t seen me do it. Basically all you do is, that’s nice and sharp actually. You stick it in one log
and then in the other, preferably on an angle like that. It’ll stop this log from rolling as I’m moving it around
and trying to scribe it. Just holds it in place. So very helpful, especially
as I get up higher. I don’t want those logs rolling off after I expend all that
energy trying to get them up on top of the high walls. (mumbles) (hammer thudding) I think another reason to
stop working on this today is these logs are frozen. People have asked me
whether I’m finding that they’re more difficult to
work when they’re frozen and whether it’s harder on the tools. And today, I think more than any day, proves that it is much harder
on the tools and on me. It started off, and
the reason I know that, is the day started off relatively mild. Logs were easier to work with
then than they are today, or now, this afternoon. And harder than they were yesterday when it was warm all day. So that, (hammer thudding) kind of just bounced out because there’s so much moisture frozen inside the log. (log crunching) That’s it, that’s the doorway. Cut out half this log
down here so that it, probably with a door stop actually, this door will swing out. So you’ll have to duck to get into it, but who cares, it’s just a sauna. And I want to keep the
outside wall six feet, which means this one coming across here has to rest on those, so it has to be at six feet as well. That’s perfect. Cut out a little square
out of this as well, a notch out of this,
to fit the door frame. That will be the door frame. So it’ll be flat, and the
door’ll but up against the inside of that. Man I never though I’d
see the top of the walls. (footsteps crunching) Can’t carry your leg with you, pup. (footsteps crunching) Yup, snowshoe time. (footsteps crunching) Let’s go find a tree, pup. (wind howling) (instrumental country music) (footsteps crunching) (wolf howling)