Keto Mindset featuring Pete Bilarczyk (@thefatadaptedathlete)

Keto Mindset featuring Pete Bilarczyk (@thefatadaptedathlete)

August 22, 2019 6 By William Morgan


Today we’re talking a little bit of keto
mindset and motivation with a special
guest! Coming right up. Hey, everybody. How are you? Aaron here. Welcome back to A.D.
Keto. This is the channel where we talk
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Today, we’re talking about mindset.
Probably, like many of you, I started this
ketogenic diet because I needed to lose
some weight. Had to shed some pounds. I
started off this past January 2017 at
roughly 275 pounds, with a goal of
getting down to about 215 (which is where
I was when I got married some 18, 19
years ago), and I hit that goal last week!
But what I realized as I was getting
closer to 215 is that I felt…really, like
I wanted to go a little bit farther than
215, and try to get down to One-derland,
that magical place, where the number
on the scale doesn’t start with a 2
anymore. Again, it’s just an arbitrary
number, but I feel like it’s within reach.
So I’m getting closer to this next goal
of mine, and I think that’s gonna be it.
I’d like to live somewhere between 190
and 199 pounds going forward. So I’ve
been in this weight loss mindset since
the beginning of 2017 — I’ve been on very
strict keto, I watch my carbs, take care
of my macros, I haven’t focused crazy on
my caloric intake, but I do tend to keep
things between — I’m at a little bit of a
deficit — I’m at probably between 1800 and
1900 calories per day. And I know that a
change is coming. When I hit you know 195
or so, I’m gonna switch from being
focused on weight loss, and I’m going to
have to change my mindset to that of
maintaining, and maybe building a little
bit of lean muscle. I think that’s kind
of the goal: Lose the weight, and then, you
know, try to add a little bit of muscle.
And I happened to be on Instagram the other day, and saw a post by a buddy of mine,
Pete Bilarczyk, also known as @thefatadaptedathlete, and he just
started up a live video, and
he was saying a lot of things that
really spoke to me. He’s a bigger guy — I
think he’s over six feet tall, but Pete
had lost a lot of weight, was a runner
for a while, and then put on some muscle.
Now I don’t think there’s any way I’m
gonna put on as much muscle as Pete has,
but I reached out to him, and asked him
if he wanted to come on the channel and
talk a little bit about his mindset, and
how it changed when he went from, you
know, weight loss mode into sort of
maintaining, and building muscle. And he
put down his acoustic guitar long enough
to agree to come on the channel, and I’m
really thankful to have him here! So Pete,
thanks for being on the channel, and
why don’t you take it away? [Pete]
Hey there, Aaron. Yeah, man. I appreciate
you having me on the channel. This is
pretty great, and it’s people like you
that are really gonna be able to pull
through the future what we’re trying to
do, and that’s, you know, if you ask me
you know, a quick one-shot, where is my
motivation, and what’s my mindset for
doing this, it started off with weight
loss, and it really started off with
health. I was trying to drive down some
markers that were bugging me, and then I
went into weight loss, and then I wanted
to be a fat adapted runner, and you know,
really went that direction. And then it
came around to, “How do I keep myself in a
in a good, healthy habit?”, and in a way it
was teaching others, and trying to put
this out there on Facebook in a way
that’s a little bit easier to digest.
You have either one of two sides of the
coin. Either have the butter groups, which
everything is like, eat more fat. Fat, fat,
fat, fat. Then you have the science groups,
which everything just gets hit with a
pub med study, and loads and loads of, you
know, different links which will
completely confuse the layman. And you
know, I had to really immerse myself
deeply in what I was doing. Now, you and I,
we’ve had very similar paths. I went up —
at my heaviest, I was up at about 275 — but
you know recently, before I started this,
I went up to 268. I’ve almost always kept
myself in that to 220-235 range. When I
was a kid, I was a competitive martial
artist, and I spent a lot of time sucking
down gatorade. You know, eating lots and
lots of calories, and lots of lots of
bulk to be able to maintain, you know,
three four hours worth of class every
day. And that’s what created some of my
damage, some of my metabolic damage, to
where the same thing that I was doing
stopped working. So I had to find new
things, and I was lucky enough to be
listening to a radio show
that was in the New York area. They Vinnie Tortorich on, who heads up the No
Sugar, No Grains group, and the things
that he was saying was very similar to
what I was doing, but I had them
fragmented, and split apart. And I had to
pull them all together. So for myself now,
as I go out and I set out to try to
figure this out for myself, I realized
that the resources were really bad, so
during this time, over about six months, I
dropped from you know the 270 range down
to 215. I decided there was no way that I
could ever be 270 pounds again, and run
30, 40 miles a week, where I actually
brought my capacity up to a good 60
miles a week, and hit a 2,000-mile year,
which was… which was great, but that
causes a lot of stress on the body, and I
got to a point that I was down at 199.
You know, as you said, the One-derland, it’s
a very fun place to be, because we’re not
there all the time. You know, or we
haven’t seen that since, you know, our
younger, younger years. So I got there,
but then I started looking at photos of
me, and friends were making some comments, like, it’s, you know, everybody tries to
rib you a little bit, but, “Hey, you know, you
went from fat now you’re too skinny”, and
they’d never give you that right credit. And I was looking at some of the photos,
and it was more angle stuff, and I
realized I was getting a little skinny, I
was not feeling as confident. I always
like to carry some muscle, and then I
decided, well, as I’m running I was doing
the wrong things, and you know, most of
the information that we get out there on
the internet — and I encourage everybody
to you know really dive deep into the
data that’s out there — but the
information that we get is that protein
is bad, and that can kick us out of
ketosis, so we have to moderate it, and
it’s automatically going to turn over to
sugar in your liver, and that it will
continue your insulin resistance, but
then after I traveled a little further
along the path, I realized that that is
not really the process in exactly the
way it happens. It’s more of an emergency
pull system, where protein can get pulled
into the liver as needed, if needed, and
you know, help replenish your glycogen
storage. So when I started to go down
that path, and realize, “Okay, so what is
the right amount of protein?”, I started to
search, and then I realized that Phinney and Volek had it in their book, and I
overlooked it — The Art and Science of Low
Carb Living,
and Low Carb Performance —
not sure which one, I believe it’s the
‘Performance’ book — they clearly state that
they want you to moderate protein, which
is the part that everybody took, and left
it there, but they said they wanted you
to moderate your protein to about
0.6 to 1 gram of protein, per
lean pound of body mass. Now when I
started to do that — now I’m 225 pounds
now, I was 199 at that point, I was 20
percent body fat — what I did is I
started to take in more like 150, 160, and
it was fine. And you know, I stopped
running. The cortisol that comes from
running, and not replenishing those
carbohydrates as fast, you know, can be taxing on the body. So I stopped all that, and I
brought myself over to just lifting, and
I stuck with a heavy lifting regime for
the past year, gained 20 pounds of lean
muscle, and I did that by adding the
protein in. Now through that running time,
if I would have kept my protein up, and
would have you know did something to
create some stress on the muscles, the
other muscles cuz all I was doing is
running, I probably wouldn’t have lost
that, so that’s where I encourage you, to
not look at these as separate events in
your life, that through the process of
you dropping your weight, it’s a great
thing to add in some good, heavy workouts
that will stimulate your muscle growth,
which ultimately is the overflow for
your glycogen. You know, you have your
liver, which stores it, and you also have
the muscles. So the more muscle you have,
the more that you have a place that can
actually handle that excess glycogen. So
that was the switch for me. Now what
motivated me to make that switch is that
when I was running super, super, heavy
miles, and keeping my carbohydrates down
at 20, I was creating stress and on the
body to have to make all those
carbohydrates through gluconeogenesis,
through the protein coming in. And it
really tanked out my testosterone. So
I’ve kind of had to put that all on the
side, got back to a good heavy lifting
regime, started to eat a little bit…
Iwould say cleaner keto, where I focus
more on nutrient density than anything
else. And with that, everything turned
around, and it just took some heavy
squats at the gym to put the muscle back
on.
You know, so that was really, really the
story of how I kind of changed from
being in the mindset where everything
needed to be skinny, skinny, skinny, and
lose weight, and it didn’t matter at what
cost. If I had to get rid of
nutrient-dense food because it was
protein, to do that, I was doing that. But
then I came back around, and realized
that you know, the true importance is
gonna switch to health. Health, and how
you feel when you’re doing that, and
that’s really where I changed it up. When
I started to focus on that it was health,
it was nutrient density. It’s not eating
a hot dog because it’s keto, It’s trying
to find sardines. The things that we don’t like to eat every day. Liver. You know, eat the
whole animal, get some good, healthy
spinach, and you know, good cruciferous
vegetables to back that up, because it’s
really a balance to get all those
nutrients from everything that we need.
And that’s when I changed that. That you
know, my life started to change, and I
really started to feel that I was going
after something, and through that, that’s
where I tried to teach it in the group,
and I’m happy that I met you on
Instagram, and that I found everybody, you
know, that I was able to pull a lot of people
over towards that group, and that’s where
we continue to teach ultrarunners, guys
that are running 50 and 100-mile races,
and how to have them do that with the lowest dosage of carbohydrates, so that they can
keep the inflammation down, and be able
to utilize that fat storage the way that
we need to, we want to be fat-adapted, and
be able to supply enough protein to help
the body repair, after you do all that
heavy work. So I gotta get back to
playing some guitar, and it was great
talking with you, and I hope that your
channel has much success. And if there’s
anything you need, always reach out to me
@thefatadaptedathlete. Thanks! [Aaron] Wow, Pete. Thanks for that. I always love listening
to you talk about nutrition, especially
as it pertains to keto and low carb, and
exercise as pertains to keto and low
carb. Just fascinating stuff. Guys, do
yourself a favor, and go check out Pete’s
Facebook group. It’s The Fat Adapted
Athlete. If you go to Facebook, look up —
The Fat Adapted Athlete. That’s it. It’s
an absolute treasure trove of
information, and articles, and a super-
friendly community, and tips and tricks
about, you know, exercise and nutrition, as
it pertains to low carb eating and keto
eating. It’s a great resource, so check
that out. So that’s gonna wrap up this
video. I’d love to hear from you guys in
the comments. Again, big thanks to Pete, @thefatadaptedathlete. Check out his Facebook group. I will link it in the description below,
and I hope you have a fantastic,
fantastic day, and I’ll talk to you next
time!