Is The Keto Diet Good For Candida And the Gut?

Is The Keto Diet Good For Candida And the Gut?

July 29, 2019 19 By William Morgan


Greetings, Eric Bakker, Naturopath.
Thanks for coming back.
We’re going to talk about keto, keto diet
and the candida.
If you watch videos like Dr. Eric Berg, who
does a great job on keto, I just watched recently
one of his videos on keto diet, intermittent
fasting and candida, which is a very, very
good video, and it makes a lot of sense.
Keto is an excellent diet for people, which
is a bit like the MEVY diet, meat, eggs, vegetables
and yogurt.
So eliminating sugar, the shitty carbohydrates
that many people eat like breads and crackers
and chips and junk like that, things that
tend to have a quick blood sugar response,
have always been in my opinion a bad kind
of choice when it comes to candida.
This is something I’ve really tried to communicate
across on this channel, the Candida Crusher
channel.
So I’ve done many videos on diet, enough there
for you to get a good understanding on what’s
good and what’s not good when it comes to
eating.
So but the keto diet is excellent because
the body is now going to start utilizing fat
for energy and ketones rather than glucose
or the carbohydrate pathway.
The transition can be quite tough for some
people, I’ve noticed, but does it work for
candida?
It does.
It does work for candida.
There are many dietary approaches when it
comes to candida, but the keto approach is
particularly good.
I like the intermittent fasting bit too, because
it also trains people to learn to eat differently
from how they normally eat.
It’s good to understand that there’s a lot
of psychology behind eating, and when you
do fasting you learn to push food away and
not to always think about food and have the
brain engage, which stimulates the gut to
want that food all the time.
So cleansing occurs with fasting, however
I’ve never been a fan of fasting, personally.
I don’t really see the need to fast, in my
opinion, for most of my clients in the clinic.
What I do like to say every now and then to
people, particularly when it’s warranted,
is to skip one meal of the day or eat much
smaller portion sizes in general.
So many people eat too much food, too often,
too frequently, and also people don’t really
have a mindfulness approach when it comes
to eating.
They just eat stuff for the sake of eating
it.
They don’t really think.
When you’re driving a car, you’re thinking
all the time.
You’re paying attention.
When you’re eating, however, going to the
refrigerator, you’re probably not really paying
any attention.
You’ll have some kid screaming in the background,
or you’ll have a wife or husband yelling at
you or, “Hey, make me a cup of coffee,” or
there’s something going on so you’re not paying
a lot of attention.
Especially stress and boredom come into it
and tend to precipitate poor diet choices.
So lifestyle, a good lifestyle or bad lifestyle,
can certainly initiate that in a person to
create pretty sloppy and crappy eating habits.
I’m a big fan of getting a lifestyle to a
high degree where you’re happy with how you
live, and to really work a good diet around
your lifestyle.
So keto does work well, but as I mentioned,
the transition period can be quite rough.
So I’m not a fan of high meat diets at all,
so paleo kind of high meat consumptions I
think are just too hard on the gut, too hard
on the kidney.
They create too much waste in the body.
I believe in a much lower meat approach, and
particularly when it comes to foods like fish.
Very good-quality ocean-caught fish and high-grade
free range chicken are two excellent protein
sources, for example, but lots of lamb and
pork and beef and bison and venison, all that
kind of stuff, I just think it’s over the
top.
It’s too much overload for the gut.
I prefer people to have lighter protein choices
in their diet, and particularly the legumes
and the nuts and seeds.
Again, I’m also not anti-grain at all.
I don’t think people should avoid grains entirely
in their diet, but a balanced approach.
So if you’re wondering if keto is good, it
is good but it will not eradicate candida.
Many of my clients who have been on keto diets
prolonged, and even with stool testing I’ve
found candida there.
So it’s not going to guarantee that you’re
going to eliminate candida, but it’s certainly
going to clean up your gut and help to burn
fat and improve cognition and various other
aspects.
So, here’s what you do if you’re thinking
about going on a keto diet.
Let’s say you’ve got a bit of weight, and
you’ve got issues with your digestion.
As you do a stool test, a comprehensive stool
test times three, so three samples on three
days, as you’re doing your keto diet or as
you’re just initiating it.
And then you may want to wait three months
and repeat that.
Just do one sample, and then look at the microbiology
of your gut when you’ve been on keto for 12
weeks as opposed to what you were previously
doing.
That will give you a good understanding of
which direction your gut is heading into in
terms of immune responses, inflammatory responses
and things like that.
And you can also see the microbiology to see
if it’s changed for the positive or negative.
So many people go through a gut kind of a
change as they’re changing their diet, and
this is quite normal.
So some bacteria will come up, some will come
down.
Some yeast species will come up, some will
come down.
But look at the signs and symptoms of how
you feel, and that will also give you a pretty
good indication to what level the microbiology
is changing in the gut.
So, I’m all for keto.
Intermittent fasting is excellent for some
people, but for many people I know it doesn’t
really do much, or they find it too difficult
to work with.
But that choice is yours, all up to you, so
yes, a tick for keto and a question mark for
the intermittent fasting.
Thanks for posing the question.