Is CLA Good For Weight Loss?

Is CLA Good For Weight Loss?

August 2, 2019 100 By William Morgan


C L A, short for conjugated linoleic acid,
is yet another trending supplement claimed
to burn fat and help you lose weight.
CLA itself is a trans fat, albeit naturally
occurring unlike the manufactured types deemed
dangerous for our health.
28 different isomer forms of CLA exists, but
for fat loss, only two of the more heavily
researched forms, t-10 and t-11 CLA, are touted
for its potential benefits.
t-11 CLA has the potent ability to bind and
activate the receptor PPAR alpha, which is
believed to increase fat burning in the liver.
t-10, on the other hand, seems to inhibit
the function PPARy, which controls triglyceride
formation within fat cells.
Pair activation of PPAR alpha and inhibition
of PPARy, along with other minor mechanisms,
the supposition of CLA being an effective
fat burner and weight loss supplement have
run rampant.
But of course, none of it matters if the actual
results do not reflect it.
And in summary, CLA research gets a bit…
flabby… when it comes to these claims.
Some of the scientific literature do report
CLA increasing fat and weight loss, especially
with a mixture of both t-10 and t-11. However,
almost all cases were reported insignificant
results. The most weight loss attributed to
CLA was observed in a 2011 study that amounted
a total of 1.13 kilograms, or 2 and a half
pounds, of weight loss over the span of…
4 months. Most studies noted little to no
loss and, in some cases, weight gain.
It’s also important to note that the minimal
weight loss results were found primarily in
overweight and obese subjects. T-10 CLA seems
to play the largest role in these cases. However,
t-10 has also been connected to adverse health
effects, like increased fatty liver, inflammation,
and insulin resistance, dangerous issues that
are amplified in heavier individuals.
For those in a bit more shape, a 2002 study
found no performance nor ergogenic value for
resistance-trained individuals taking CLA.
And honestly, that’s really all there is
to CLA as of right now, even though it has
been heavily researched. It’s fat and weight
loss benefits just aren’t that great.
However, one potential saving grace is that
CLA might promote fullness, or satiety, which
can mean eating fewer calories per day. A
2016 study showed that drinking a smoothie
mixed with 5 grams of CLA delayed lunch 40
minutes longer than a control group. Alkong
with that, the CLA group also consumed a whopping
500 calories FEWER per day.
Unfortunately, the research has yet to be
replicated. And one can argue that other unwanted
factors might be in play, considering that
CLA intolerance has also been reported, invoking
events of upset stomach, constipation, and
diarrhea. Not exactly issues worth dealing
with for the sake of losing weight.
Until more research can definitively support
the satiety efficacy with CLA, there’s only
one way to sum everything up:
When it comes to fat and weight loss, CLA,
based on the current research, is a CL-nay…
And I should stop trying to make puns.
What are your thoughts on CL-nay? Worth trying
at least? Better off saving your money on
real food? Let me know in the comments. As
always, thank you for watching!