Instant Pot Yukgaejang, or Spicy Red Korean Pot Roast: Naturally Keto / Low-carb

Instant Pot Yukgaejang, or Spicy Red Korean Pot Roast: Naturally Keto / Low-carb

July 28, 2019 6 By William Morgan


Hello! This is Becky Marshall of Becky
Marshall Design with: Yukgaejang! or…
Red-hot Korean pot roast!
It’s a slow-cooked, or in this case,
pressure-cooked spicy beef and vegetable
soup that I think is just perfect for
people eating low-carb in winter! Or
anyone, but it is low-carb and keto-friendly
Before we get started, I must
credit Chef John of www.foodwishes.com,
whose slow cooker pot roast recipe I
pulled technique from, for this mildly
Americanized version of yukgaejang! Let’s
start by liberally seasoning the beef
roast with salt and pepper.
Yukgaejang is traditionally made with
brisket, but brisket is expensive… so I
used a chuck blade roast. Any big cheap
hunk of tough beef is going to taste
amazing in this recipe, so make your own
decision. Do make sure to count the bones
in the roast so that you know how many
you need to pull out in the end. Next,
lightly spank some cornstarch or flour
into the meat. And I know, I can hear you
from here: “Becky, I thought this was a
keto recipe, but you’re using cornstarch!?”
That’s right, the starch is doing
something importan. It helps brown the
meat, which adds flavor, and it thickens
the soup liquid in the end. Remember, this
is a couple tablespoons on three pounds
of meat that can serve eight people, so
chill, keto police. It’s gonna be OK.
Move your giant hunk of beef into a hot,
oiled, large skillet. You want it sizzling
when it hits the pan, always. We are just
browning the beef, not cooking it through,
so let it sizzle for a couple minutes
and check for a nice crust on the bottom,
then flip when it’s browned. Remove to a
plate and reserve. Into the pan, add some
anchovies. You won’t be able to taste
them but they’re a hidden flavor bomb.
Add sliced shiitake or oyster mushrooms,
any mushrooms will work, then add the
sliced white parts of a leek, and then
add your gochujang paste. This is a
Korean red pepper flake mixed with oil
and other seasonings. I use store-bought,
but it has sugar in it, and you can make
your own pretty easily. Add more or less
to adjust spiciness… you know how we like it.
You know what they say: “You sing the
final song, of your gochujang.” Let this
all cook for a few minutes until the
mushrooms and leeks get softer and
browner and sexier, then turn down the
heat and add in some minced garlic and
sesame oil. Let the garlic cook for a
little and take the raw edge off. We’re
almost done here. Pour in as much chicken
broth as you want soup liquid. Stir well
and make sure to scrape up any of that
fond left in the pan. Add seaweed while
this simmers down. It adds a whole other
dimension to the broth. I used nori… that’s
sushi seaweed… because that’s what I had.
Koreans use a completely different
seaweed called miyeok, or in Japanese it’s
called wakame. You should be able to find
some seaweed in the grocery store… put it
in. When the mixture is done simmering,
remove the seaweed. Don’t forget to pour
in the resting juices from your giant
hunk of beef. That is gooooood. So here comes
the easy part: into your instant pot, add
some roughly chopped daikon– that’s a
large, mild, Asian radish. Add the green
tops of your leeks. Slicing these on a
diagonal will make yours look much nicer
than mine did. And then place your
browned roast on top of the bed of
vegetables. It’s okay if you have to
shove it in. Pour your gochujang mixture
on top of the pot roast, put the top on
your instant pot, set it to stew for one
hour and walk away. Slow releasing the
pressure is always a good idea for low-
and-slow pulled meats. When the instant
pot is depressurized, open the lid and
remove all the bones that you counted at
the beginning of the recipe. You can also
take this opportunity to skim off some
of the fat. This is optional. And I didn’t do it.
Set the instant pot to saute. We have
some last ingredients to add. First I’m
adding something called Gosari. That’s
Korean. The English translations of this
vegetable are: fernbrake, royal vegetables,
fiddlehead ferns, bracken [laughs]…
pretty great names.
I found mine pre-soaked in the
refrigerated section of my local Korean
grocery store, H-mart. More frequently you
find gosari dried, and you soak it before
you cook with it. You
find it on Amazon, I’ll put a link in the
description below. You can leave this
vegetable out, but according to my
research a ton of Koreans call go sari their favorite part of yukgaejang. It’s
up to you. Besides go sari, you’ll want
to add scallions, sliced into spears… a lot…
and bean sprouts. Most
yukgaejang recipes recommend pulling the
beef out to shred it into bits before
serving, but you can just as easily serve
this soup with big chunks of fork-tender,
fall-apart beef. And I forgot one last
optional step: pour scrambled (beaten) eggs over
the soup and then turn off the heat to
let them poach in the liquid. Serve in a
bowl with a side of kimchi, not pictured.
And there you have it!
Yukgaejang! I think this soup is just
delicious!
It’s full of fork-tender beef, an array
of vegetables with an array of textures
and mouthfeels, and a lot of red-hot
spice. Of course you can adjust how spicy
you like it based on how much gochujang
you add. And that was delicious, I think
it turned out pretty great and so did my
friends, but that wasn’t good enough for
me, so I decided to specifically invite a
Korean friend over. Thank you, Ye Jin, for
being my sample size of one! Who knows if
Ye Jin was just being polite, but she did
give her formal stamp of approval. So
that’s it, here’s wishing you a happy
holidays and delicious winter cooking. I
really do hope you give this a try,
head to the description box below for a
link to all of the ingredients and
information you need. And as always… enjoy!