How to Make Cheese Curds

How to Make Cheese Curds

August 30, 2019 15 By William Morgan


Hi friends, I have an easy cheese recipe for you today. Come into my kitchen. Let me show you how to make cheese curds.
The following recipes uses 2 gallons, but you’ll notice today
I have four with me and that’s because I’m going to make a double batch.
I plan to make an orange colored curd and a white colored curd today. So follow along with me. Let’s get started.
Here’s a tip I learned along the way. If you’re using pasteurized not homogenized
milk like I am it can sometimes be difficult to pour. It’s not a problem,
just take a sanitized knife and pierce the cream layer on the top.
Swish it around a little. It will make your life so much easier when you pour this milk
Take two gallons of pasteurized un homogenized milk and slowly heat it to 90 degrees F.
And while you’re heating the milk you can stir occasionally.
You’ll notice since I’m making a double batch I’m just going to be moving in between each pot
It doesn’t really matter if you use the same utensils- it’ll be fine.
I’ve decided to switch the pots
because this is a smaller pot on a bigger burner and I’m noticing that the temperature is heating up quite a bit faster.
So I’m going to make it easy on myself and try to get the temperatures to rise at about the same time.
So I’m just going to put the smaller pot on the smaller burner larger pot on the larger brother. I think that’ll work just fine.
Oh, yeah, this will be more even for sure.
Once the target temp of 90 degrees F is reached you’ll add a quarter teaspoon and mesophilic culture and just sprinkle it on the top and
you’ll do this to each batch if you’re making two
and let it rest for five minutes.
So we’ll turn off the heat
cover the pots.
We’ll see you in five minutes. Once the five minutes has elapsed you can go ahead and stir in the culture into the milk.
Now if you’d like to make orange cheese curds, this is your opportunity to add the annatto.
I have kids in my life who tell me that orange cheese curds taste better–
It’s not true!
We’ll just add a half a teaspoon of annatto.
You’ll stir in the annatto for one minute.
But then we’ll cover the pots and let them rest for 45 minutes
See you in 45 minutes.
The 45-minute ripening time is over and now we’ll set the curd.
I’m using pasteurized non homogenized milk. So I’m going to dilute calcium chloride in a quarter cup of non-chlorinated water first.
So you’ll take a half a teaspoon of calcium chloride and add it to the water
And then you’ll add it to the milk.
And then you’ll stir it in.
Stir for one minute using a top and down stirring motion.
You’ll take a quarter cup of non chlorinated water.
And to it you’ll add a half teaspoon of rennet.
And then stir up and down for no longer than one minute.
And you’ll cover the pot and
let it rest for 45 minutes.
All right, 45 minutes has elapsed and now it’s time to see if we have a clean break.
So you just take your curd knife or a long knife,
insert it into the center of the curds and pull it back.
Here’s what you’re looking for: you’re looking for the whey to seep into the crack and
that one looks really good. So I’ll check the other
and yes, definitely we have a clean break. Now it’s time to cut the curd.
Cut the curds vertically then horizontally in one half inch cubes.
Now cover the pot and let the curds heal for five minutes.
Once the curds have healed it’s time to cook the curds.
You’ll take these curds up to 104 degrees F over a 30 minute period of time.
While you’re bringing the curds up to temperature.
Stir occasionally, they want to take the full 30 minutes to reach the 104 degree F target temp
And once your target temperature of 104 is reached you can go ahead and turn off the heat.
You’ll just want to maintain it at 104 degrees.
over the next 30 minutes.
Cook the curds
for the next 30 minutes at a steady hundred and four degrees F.
You can stir a little more vigorously now because the curds aren’t quite as fragile.
By the end of the 30 minutes you should have curds about the size of peanuts.
Once the 30 minutes have elapsed you can test the curds and see if they’ll stick together and then come apart easily.
We want to take the curds,
squeeze them gently.
Yeah, and then they should just break apart really easily.
Perfect.
I’ll cover the pots and allow the curds to sink to the bottom for 15 minutes.
And now it’s time to prepare the draining area. Take a fine mesh colander and place it into the sink.
And then drain the curds into the colander.
Very gently squeeze it into a solid mass. Just a real light squeeze.
Place a clean towel over the curves and let that curd slab rest for 15 minutes.
I’ll complete the same step with a second batch.
Very very gently shape this into a slab don’t push too hard.
See you in 15 minutes.
We’re moving on to the cheddaring process and it’s time to prepare the sink area with a water bath so we can place our
milk bins in the water. So you fill the sink with hot water.
Now you’ll take your pot and you’ll place it into the hot water.
And you’ll take the cheese slab
and very gently
You’ll lay it
Into the bottom of the pot.
It’s very fragile at this point.
And now you take an empty milk jug and you fill it half full with hot water and
Then you’ll take the jug and place it on top of the slab.
You cover the whole pot with a towel.
And to now, I’ll repeat the process with the second pot.
Here’s what we do after the first cheddaring step you’ll remove the cloth
and
remove the hot liquid
Then you’ll reach in you’ll take out the slab
and carefully place it on a cutting board.
Now there’s a fair bit of whey here and you’ll want to drain that before we flip it over.
So you can drain it into a pot or just in the sink, whatever is fine.
And then
They’ll take the slab,
turn it over,
Place it back into the pot.
Replace the hot water,
And cover it again
And now I’ll do the same thing with the second pot.
That’s the cheddaring process.
You will repeat this step eight times total for a total of two hours.
I am on flip number four and
I’m moving the slab and I’ve noticed that this slab is getting pretty thin
So I’ve made a decision and here’s what I’m going to do-
I’m going to go ahead and cut the slab
in half with the sanitized knife
And I’m going to stack them on top of each other.
And then just place them back into the pot.
During the eighth step cheddering process just make sure that the water stays at least at 102 degrees F both in the sink and
in the jug.
Once the chattering is complete the curds will have a rubbery texture and they should be shiny.
Go ahead and cut the curds into 1-inch cubes.
Then you sprinkle a tablespoon and a half of non-iodized salt on to the cheese curds and mix it in thoroughly.
once you finished mixing in the salt is take a towel and
Cover them overnight
We’ll see you in the morning and the next morning you’ll be rewarded with some beautiful delicious squeaky cheese curds
They look amazing
I’ve decided to weigh them because I’d like to understand the yield. So I’m going to go ahead and do that just a minute.
Typically speaking two gallons of milk usually produces about two pounds of cheese depending on the cheese.
and
We’re right on.
Two pounds three ounces, that’s a great yield.
Hey, hey get your paws off my cheese curds!
And that’s it this is how to make homemade cheese curds.
it’s a great beginning cheese making recipe because it doesn’t require any special equipment or
even a cheese cave to mature. You can enjoy this cheese as early as the next morning. Oh
Wait one more thing. Have you ever wondered, “Why do cheese curds squeak?”
Well, I have an answer for you and that’s because they’re fresh.
So as long as you keep them at room temperature, the cheese curds will squeak when you eat them.
But once you put them in the refrigerator
They’ll lose the squeak. By the way, you can keep them in the refrigerator for up
to two weeks if they last that long, I plan to use mine for poutine tonight.
Thank you so much for watching. We appreciate your support like and subscribe and hit the notification bell so you don’t miss a video and
we will see you in the next episode.