How Long Does It Take To Reverse Insulin Resistance?

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Insulin Resistance?

August 21, 2019 100 By William Morgan


how long does it take to reverse insulin
resistance in order to answer that
question there are several things that
we need to understand like what are some
of the mechanisms of insulin resistance
and how can we measure and keep track of
them so we know if we’re making progress
what if we’d like to make it happen
faster then what are some things that we
can do to speed it up is there even such
a thing as a complete reversal what do
we have to look forward to and after we
have reversed it what can a lifestyle do
we have to adopt to stay insulin
sensitive today we’re going to talk
about all those things that you have a
really clear picture coming right up
I’m doctor Ekberg I’m a holistic doctor
and a former Olympic decathlete and if
you want to truly master health by
understanding how the body really works
make sure that you subscribe and hit
that notification bell so that you don’t
miss anything this is one of the most
common questions I’ve received so I
decided to make a video to try to answer
as many aspects as possible and when
people ask they want to know why is my
glucose still high how long is it going
to take for my glucose my fasting
glucose readings to change how long is
it going to take for my a 1 C to come
down my doctor says my glucose my a1c is
is too high they want to keep giving me
meds how long do I have to take those
meds and then they ask once they’ve
understand a little bit more maybe they
start asking about well what about
insulin and and home iír how long is
going to take for that to change and
then they want to know about setpoint
that’s the body have a tendency to go
back to a certain weight does it change
its metabolism to get back to its set
point it’s like there’s a cell memory
and then finally there is the issue of
genetics so all of these things are
criteria that influence the mechanism or
the measurement of insulin resistance so
we’ll deal with those in some more
detail but just a real quick review to
understand the mechanism that this is a
long term process that there’s a lot of
people whether it’s diabetes or whether
it’s neck pain or some other ailment and
people say oh well it just happened I
was died just diagnosed last week this
is a new thing and when it comes to
health unless there was a trauma unless
you fell down the stairs or you were in
a car accident there is no such thing as
a new thing it has developed over time
it is an adaptation blood sugar insulin
insulin resistance it’s an adaptation we
exposed
into something it does it it’s best to
balance things out despite the things
for doing to it but in the end it can’t
keep up with the with the adaptations we
want to think of the body and insulin as
having a carbohydrate tolerance machine
you have a machine that can process
carbohydrate it has a certain threshold
a certain endurance of how long and how
much it can do that and if you just push
it too far too long then you basically
broke it and if you broke it then you
have to take some more forceful steps
some more dramatic steps in order to
reverse it then you would have to do
just to maintain it you eat something
and your glucose goes up your blood
glucose increases then the body produces
insulin in an appropriate amount in a
sufficient amount to get the glucose out
of the bloodstream and into the cell and
maintain a normal glucose level
ultimately the goal of even having blood
glucose is to deliver it to the cells so
the goal itself is not a certain level
of glucose it’s to maintain a certain
level to maintain a steady fuel delivery
to the cells of the body but insulin is
necessary to get the glucose from the
bloodstream and into the cells initially
there is a balance there’s only a little
bit of insulin required for a little bit
of glucose and we are what we call
insulin sensitive but as the years go by
the more sugar we eat the more carbs we
eat the more frequently we eat the more
blood sugar there is the harder it is
for the insulin to get the sugar into
the cells because there’s more sugar and
eventually the cells don’t want it so
the insulin goes up and up and up so
after five or ten years then the glucose
might still be normal because the body
is producing enough
it’s succeeding at keeping the glucose
at a certain level and the diabetes it
doesn’t happen until we’ve come so far
that the insulin isn’t sufficient there
is no amount of insulin almost that will
get the sugar into the cell because the
cells are become so resistant and that’s
where we get severe insulin resistance
with pre-diabetes and diabetes but the
thing to understand is that this did not
happen overnight we’re talking decades
for the most part some people that are a
little bit genetically predisposed they
have less tolerance they might break the
Machine in five years but other people
it probably takes 20 years for the most
part to break the Machine if you will so
now let’s come back and talk about some
of these criteria so we know that the
problem is too much sugar too much carb
driving insulin the cells resisted so
the glucose stays in the bloodstream and
we get high blood glucose so people want
to ask when is that coming down it’s
gonna vary a lot for some people as soon
as they stop eating sugar if they just
don’t put sugar in their mouth for a
week or a couple of weeks then their
blood sugar goes down other people have
to be more dramatic they might cut out
all sugar they might go into ketosis
they might do fasting and that will
bring it down but some people do that
and it still stays high for weeks or
even months even if the glucose stays
relatively high even if it’s reading a
hundred and fifty hundred and sixty even
170 but you have stopped eating
carbohydrate your body is reversing the
process even if it takes months to get
there because once you stop putting
carbohydrates and sugar into your system
then the body doesn’t have to fight so
hard to get it out so it’s not gonna
make more insulin until you eat
something else so we’ve talked about
this in some other videos on dawn
Naumann on but the point is that is
still the thing that comes down the
fastest whether it happens in days or
weeks or months it’s still the thing
that changes the fastest the second
fastest thing is your a1c which is a
three to four month average of blood
glucose glucose changes by the hour a 1c
changes by the month so even if your
blood glucose goes from a hundred and
sixty to ninety almost in a few days
almost overnight it’s still gonna take
there’s no point in measuring a1c a week
later because it’ll have changed maybe
zero point something but in four to six
weeks you’ll see a significant change
and in several months is when you start
seeing dramatic differences where you
can get into a normal range that people
ask well how long do I have to take
medication and I’m not a medical doctor
so I can’t give you advice on medication
but just understand that they gave you
the medication because your blood sugar
was too high but once your blood sugar
comes down or once you stop putting
sugar into your system you basically
don’t need the meds or don’t need as
much but that’s a discussion that you
have to take up with your medical doctor
but the need for meds essentially
follows the glucose and the a1c
because that’s what the meds are there
for to lower glucose and that’s why they
were prescribed because you had a high
glucose or in high a 1c but now we’re
getting to insulin and the Homa I are
the measurement the blood test to
measure how much insulin how hard does
the body have to work how much insulin
does it have to produce to keep the
blood level blood glucose level where it
is right now and this is something that
takes years decades
remember the glucose only came up at the
end once pre-diabetes turned into
diabetes
lucasz really shot up that’s at the end
of a 20 year process but now you’ve had
20 years of becoming insulin resistant
so therefore this is going to change
very very slowly we’re talking months
for some people who are not so insulin
resistant but four people are very
insulin resistant even if you do all the
things right you can probably expect it
to take years to truly get that insulin
resistance down some people might have
to do fasting for extended fasts three
four five days a week maybe two weeks
and every time they do that the insulin
levels will drop a little bit but you
might have to do that many many times to
get it down into a normal range there
number five cell memory and setpoint so
this is more of a conceptual thing that
it’s not something we can measure
specifically like where is your set
point but we know that there is such a
thing because people’s metabolism change
that if you are burning a certain amount
of calories and then you eat fewer
calories but you maintain insulin levels
then your body will lower its metabolic
rate it will adjust to try to get back
to that setpoint and you will have a
ravenous hunger the body will do
everything it can to get back to the
point where it thinks you need to be and
we want to think of this as a habit your
cells have habits they develop there’s a
certain momentum after you’ve done
something for 20 years there’s a lot of
momentum there’s a lot of memory there’s
a lot of habit in the body and these
things are good and they’re bad for
someone who has been in really good
shape physically for someone who has had
a lot of muscle and then they get out of
shape it’s gonna be pretty easy for them
to get back in shape because the body
remembers it knows that hey I used to do
that I used to be that but unfortunately
the same thing holds true for
being overweight and insulin resistance
the body remembers and here we have to
understand that this is going to be
years to change this and the longer it’s
been there and the more severe it’s been
there the more dramatic and the longer
the more patient we have to be to
reverse it there is a very strong
genetic component to insulin resistance
that some people are just born into
having an easy time to gain weight for
one example the Pima Indians lived in
North America and they had no diabetes
but as soon as they were exposed to
processed foods they developed over 50
percent type-2 diabetes so they had a
very strong component so that’s
unfortunate if you have the genetics for
it but the good news is that you can
still reverse the insulin resistance you
can still develop a lifestyle where you
don’t have to have diabetes
the unfortunate thing though is that
whatever genes you have they’re yours
you were given them at conception you’ve
had them all your life there’s really
nothing that you can do about that you
can’t change genetics but you can change
epigenetics you can change how you
express those and if you don’t give you
about a sugar then it’s not going to
become diabetes so the main theme to
understand there is that there is a huge
variation between people but that
there’s still sort of an order between
these different criteria so if we look
at insulin resistance on the vertical
scale here so if we start off with a lot
of insulin resistance and then we start
creating a lifestyle to reverse it then
the first thing that’s going to go is
glucose and that’s going to happen
relatively fast that can happen like we
said in days or weeks sometimes it’ll
take a little bit longer insulin is
going to take longer it’ll be months and
years but then finally if you want to
sort of totally reverse insulin
resistance I don’t know
that it is 100% reversible I think based
on the setpoint and the cell memory we
probably always retain a little bit of
what has been but the longer that we go
the more the body sort of forgets that
longer we go without doing something and
we have another lifestyle the more the
body replaces the old memory with with
the new so there’s no definite time here
but we’re definitely certainly talking
gears what if we want to speed it up if
we want this to happen as fast as
possible then wherever we are whatever
our personal circumstances are we can
still make it happen faster for us by
understanding the order of the powerful
tools that we have so the first tool we
have is exercise just putting your body
into motion increasing circulation
increasing energy expenditure changing
hormones we’ve done lots of videos on
that so understand how to exercise the
right way to maximize the good hormones
and to minimize the bad hormones we also
talked a lot about cortisol and stress
and we’ve got videos on that but you
want to reduce stress if you have a
lifestyle that has a lot of stress you
could make cortisol that drive insulin
and blood sugar so if that’s a big
factor for you then work on reducing
stress and again learn how to exercise
so you minimize stress and maximize the
benefits and these are in order of the
power so the further down the list here
we go the the more powerful they become
so in this order exercise is the least
powerful your stress reduction is next
now we’re getting into the really
powerful ones and that’s a low-carb
high-fat diet to teach your body to go
from carbohydrate metabolism to
fat-burning metabolism and that’s done
by reducing the carbs in
that the primary fuel available is fat
and eventually the body starts using the
fat Kido is just a very strict version
of low carb high fat Kido is low carb
high fat but low carb high fat isn’t
necessarily Kido Kido is when you put
your carbs so low that your body burns
fat and a byproduct of that is something
called ketones ketones become brain fuel
they become an alternate fuel for the
body and if we can measure ketones then
that’s proof that the body has switched
from carbs to fat very significantly
that the vast majority of energy that
we’re burning is ketones is fat and
ketones as a by-product and the most
powerful tool we have is fasting so we
can start with intermittent fasting or
we can do longer fasts I recommend
people do it gradually and look up some
of the other videos on fasting in order
of importance you want to exercise you
want to reduce stress and cortisol you
want to reduce your carbs get into
ketosis and do some fasting that’s how
you make it happen faster but is it even
possible to reverse it completely we
have to understand what does it mean to
reverse it and that comes back to the
criteria so your medical doctor he’s
going to be happy he’s going to consider
it reversed as soon as your glucose and
your a1c is normal but does that mean
that you can go back to eating normal
that’s a very common question so I’m
doing this now when can I go back to
eating normally again so this depends on
what we think normal food is what does
that mean the majority of people in the
Western world think that normal is the
way that we’ve eaten for the last two
three generations but that is very very
different from how we ate the previous
several thousand generations so the way
we’ve been eating
normal the standard American diet is not
something that you’re ever going to go
back to because that’s the diet that’s
the diet full of chemicals and sugar and
processed foods that forced your body
into this adaptation in the first place
so if you do something to reverse it to
undo the adaptation you can’t go back
and doing the thing that caused the
problem in the first place so in that
sense if you think that’s what the goal
is then it is not reversible you will
not be able to go back to eat normal
what you will be able to do is to eat
real food and maintain a healthy
lifestyle so standard American diet is
terrible it has tons of sugar tons of
chemical tons of processed foods the
USDA recommendation suggests that you
eat whole food that you eat at least 50%
of grains from whole grains and so forth
but they still tell you to eat about 300
grams of carbohydrate and based on their
recommendations of added sugar no more
than 10% of calories 3 cups of dairy 6
ounces of grain and so on so much fruit
more than half of this 300 grams is
actually sugar so even though the USDA
is an improvement on the standard
American diet it is not enough it’s not
enough of a change to keep you insulin
sensitive after you have reversed this
the USDA diet may work for a very small
percentage who are physically active and
who have never developed insulin
resistance and for people who lead an
active lifestyle and don’t eat too many
meals but it is not recommended I don’t
recommend that and if you have insulin
resistance then this will push you
toward more insulin resistance so while
it is slightly better than the sad
because it tells people to
some of the the soda and the processed
foods it is only slightly better there’s
only a nuance difference really between
the standard American diet and the USDA
so we have to understand that the food
we have been eating is not going to work
you will not go back to that normal
lifestyle because it isn’t normal that’s
not food it is fake food it is chemicals
it’s processed foods it’s imposter food
it’s frankenfoods
we need to start understanding what what
real food is so meat and vegetables some
for some people some beans and tubers
roots thinks that that grow on the
planet I think a lot of people will be
able to go back to what’s called a low
carb diet that might be about a hundred
grams of carbohydrate but you still want
to eat mostly whole food I put a
question mark there because that’s not
going to be everybody if you have a
stubborn set point and if you have a
genetic predisposition then that’s
probably not going to be strict enough I
think most people are going to be able
to maintain their insulin sensitivity if
you do these things for a few years and
you get your blood values too and your
insulin to where you want it to be I
believe you’ll be able to maintain it on
a low carb diet which I think starts
around 75 grams of net carbs per day and
for some people again they might start
gaining weight they might start
increasing their insulin resistance
their home I are even on 75 grams and
then you want to learn how to find the
balance in your situation with low carb
high fat keto and how much intermittent
fasting do you have to do some people
might be able to do an 18-6 that they
eat for six hours a day two or three
meals maybe
or to meals and and then it would be Oh
mad one meal a day but whatever it is
you have to find out what the balance is
for you and on my previous video
somebody commented and said that oh you
throw so many options up there it’s like
you’re just throwing enough up there to
see if if something is gonna stick you
don’t seem very sure of yourself well
I’m not I’m sure of the principles but
no one can say what’s going to work for
you what we’re we fall into the trap
where we want someone to do a study and
we want someone to determine the one
thing that’s going to work and biology
doesn’t work like that if they do a
study and they put people through a
low-carb program and they said that the
average weight loss the average
reduction in insulin was 20% that
doesn’t mean that everyone had a 20%
reduction that means some people got a
50% reduction and some people got a 20%
increase and you don’t know which one
you’re going to be that’s why there is
no one recommendation that’s why they
can never do research and find one thing
that’s going to work for everybody
because there’s always a range that’s
why we have to understand several
different factors and we have to be
patient and we have to understand it’s
important that it’s worth it to learn
and develop this lifestyle with trial
and errors that we find the balance that
works for us and if you enjoyed this
video I think they’re going to love that
one too
thank you so much for watching and I’ll
see you in the next video