Green Tea (Matcha) Ice Cream – Sugar Free | Keto Recipes

Green Tea (Matcha) Ice Cream – Sugar Free | Keto Recipes

August 2, 2019 6 By William Morgan


Welcome to keto meals and recipes dot com. If you have seen any of my previous ice cream videos, by now
you know that I absolutely love ice cream.
Because ice cream was something that I really missed when I started keto,
my children bought me this amazing Breville ice cream maker for a Mother’s Day present a while back.
So after receiving this machine,
one of my projects was to try to figure out our favorite ice cream flavors, and make them keto.
And I also wanted to make sure that I used whole food, and that every ice cream also had that
luxurious, creamy mouthfeel. And since my favorite brand was Haagen-Dazs,
I try my best to make them as close to Haagen-Dazs as possible.
So today’s featured ice cream is one that my son Christopher really loves. It is one of his two favorites. The other one
I’m still working on and will post as soon as I get the recipe right.
The ice cream recipe I’m making today is my version of a Japanese green tea matcha ice cream.
As with all my recipes, this ice cream is sugar-free and keto. The macro nutrient ratio for this green tea matcha ice cream is
4.8 to 1 with 3.3 grams of total carbs
1.5 grams of dietary fiber
resulting in 1.8 grams of net carbs per serving.
And I know there’s several versions of green tea ice cream.
This version is going to use a custard because that will make the creamiest base. So let’s get started.
The first thing is to separate the eggs.
You’ll only need the yolks, but save the whites and you can also freeze them for some other recipes in the future. Then weigh out
your almond milk, your heavy cream, the matcha powder, and
the sweetener (which you ground to confectionery powder), and
the glucomannan powder.
Using this is optional, but I highly recommend it.
And here are all the ingredients that you’ll need.
Pour your almond milk into a pot and warm it over low heat.
And when the almond milk is just starting to simmer around the edges of the pot,
just remove it from the stovetop momentarily.
Pour about one cup of this warm almond milk into a small mixing bowl and then add your matcha powder to the warm milk.
And whisk until the matcha powder is completely dissolved in the warm almond milk.
Next, to the pot which has the rest of the almond milk, add the heavy cream,
the dissolved matcha almond milk mixture,
and stir all of this very well. Then adjust your heat setting to low and put the pot back on the stovetop.
And cook at a very low simmer until the temperature of the liquid gets to 175 Fahrenheit or 80 degrees Celsius.
While this mixture is cooking, let’s do the second part. To your bowl with the egg
yolks, add the confectionery sweetener and, using either a whisk or your electric mixer,
whip until the egg mixture is a very pale yellow and has thickened quite a bit.
This will take about three to five minutes with an electric mixer,
but this is the consistency you’re looking for.
Then, when your cream mixture on the stovetop has reached the right temperature,
Immediately remove the pot from the heat and set it aside.
The next step is to temper the egg yolk mixture.
You do this by slowly drizzling about one cup or a ladle-full of the hot matcha cream mixture as you whisk
continuously. Do this in a slow steady stream.
this step is very
important, because if you don’t do, the eggs will scramble or curdle and you’ll get little clumps, and that will ruin your custard base.
To ensure that you temper the eggs properly,
repeat with the second cup or ladle of your warm matcha liquid.
Then it’s safe to pour the rest of the warm liquid into your egg yolk bowl.
Now that the eggs are tempered, strain the egg mixture through a fine mesh sieve as you pour everything back into your original pot.
And place the pot back on the stovetop on low heat. While the custard is cooking,
it’s important that you whisk quite frequently as the liquid is warming up to a gentle simmer. And keep doing this until the custard mixture
comes to temperature of
170 degrees Fahrenheit or
77 to 80 degrees Celsius. Here’s a little trick:
If you don’t have a cooking thermometer,
You can test to see if the custard is done by dipping a spoon into the custard and then running your finger along the length
of the back of the spoon. If the line stays clean,
as I’m showing here, your custard base is done. Then remove the pot from the stovetop
immediately. You don’t want to overcook the custard. At this point, sprinkle the glucomannan powder on top of the custard and whisk immediately. And after
adding the glucomannan, whisk for about 30 to 60 seconds
to ensure that all of the glucomannan powder has been worked well into the custard mixture.
The glucomannan will help with the creaminess and, although it will still freeze if left overnight, it keeps it creamier longer.
I should have mentioned this earlier:
But while your custard is cooking the second time,
you should prepare a water bath. And you do this by placing ice cubes and cold water into a very large bowl or pot.
And, if you haven’t done so already, place the bowl in the water bath and then whisk occasionally as the custard cools to room temperature.
You’ll notice that at first the custard is very frothy. As it cools and you whisk, this frothiness will be
incorporated into the custard. So don’t worry. When your custard is at room temperature,
Cover the bowl with cling wrap and refrigerate for about three hours to chill the liquid completely.
By giving enough time for this custard to chill before making it into ice cream,
you will have the smallest crystal formation, which results in the creamiest texture.
Now it’s time to prepare your ice cream maker. And please read and use your manufacturer’s directions for your machine.
A little trick that I learned, and have adapted to all my ice cream making, is before pouring in the custard base,
I start the machine churning and pour while the blades are turning. If your machine has a degree of hardness, set it to maximum.
And here’s some lovely tunes that my machine plays to tell me that it’s done.
Not an important feature. Just a fun feature. The ice cream at this point is a very soft-serve consistency.
And you can serve it as a soft serve, or you can scoop the ice cream into a chilled, freezer safe container.
Place the cling wrap directly onto the ice cream
and cover with an airtight lid.
Then place in the freezer for about four to six, and sometimes even eight hours,
or until you can scoop out your ice cream and feel just a teeny bit of resistance.
This ice cream is amazing any time. If you like green tea lattes, you will absolutely love this ice cream.
The Japanese people are very elegant about their food presentation,
so I’m going to enhance my presentation by garnishing with some fresh strawberries.
It only takes a moment and all you have to do is cut a whole strawberry into thin slices lengthwise.
You do this by starting at the tip and cut up towards the green stem.
But not all the way through.
Leave about a quarter of an inch or a millimeter, then fan out the pieces on a platter like I’m showing here in my pink
bowl. We like the taste of the fresh strawberries with this ice cream because they perfectly complement each other.
When I get really creative, I like to make strawberry roses because they look really nice, like the one on this white plate.
My expert taste testers, aka Chris, Alex and my husband David, love this green tea matcha ice cream.
And they enjoyed it so much, they asked for seconds and even thirds. The ice cream was all gone in less than one day.
I do hope that you give this green tea matcha ice cream a try, and that your family likes it as much as we do.
This ice cream is a popular dessert in Japanese restaurants in both Japan and North America,
because it complements the flavors of other Japanese foods, and because it is a really nice way to end the meal.
And here is my husband’s favorite Japanese style dinner:
Teriyaki Steak Salad with Strawberries. And this time, when I made it, I served it with the green tea ice cream as a
dessert. It was amazing.
The comment I got for this meal was that they felt they were at a high end Japanese restaurant.
I’m sure a little bit lavish praise, but it made me feel good.
Here’s the macronutrient chart for the Teriyaki Steak Salad with Strawberries and the Green Tea Matcha Ice Cream.
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The link for the printable
Green Tea Matcha Ice Cream recipe, as well as the Teriyaki Steak Salad with Strawberries video, will be posted in the description below.