Five Rules For a Perfect Steak

Five Rules For a Perfect Steak

August 9, 2019 100 By William Morgan


Hey there, and welcome back to NoRecipeRequired.com.
Itís Dave, and tonight Iím going to show
you how to cook a steak. I always get comments
from friends and relatives, and people posting
on the website, ìTell me more about how to
cook a steak to the right donenessî.
Iím going to go through really five basic
rules that I follow to get you to a good steak,
right doneness, great flavor, every single
time. Letís ah, letís go ahead and get to
it.
Ok, so, weíre going to talk about cooking
the perfect steak, and my five rules for cooking
the perfect steak. First rule is Know Your
Steak. What do I mean by that? So obviously,
you need to know what youíre cooking. You
need to know, this is a ribeye, are you cooking
a ribeye, or are you cooking a New York Strip,
or a filet mignon or a London broil. What
are you cooking? Because thatís going to
help determine the doneness, and what you
can do, and what the right meat and the best
temperature to cook it at is. You know, something
like a flank steak, I think can go a little
bit further done than say a filet mignon.
You also want to know the thickness of the
steak right. The thickness will determine
the time that is required to cook. The thicker
the steak, the longer the time itís going
to take to get to the right temperature in
the middle of the steak. You also have to
look for things like, the bone. This particular
steak is a bone-in ribeye. The bone will generally
delay the cooking process, make it a little
bit longer. So the meat right here along the
bone, will tend to stay a little less cooked,
or more rare than the rest of the steak. Once
you observe, pay attention to,î ok this size
steak took this long to cookî, you become
accustomed to gauging the right temperature.
And you know the thickness will also determine
how much seasoning you need on the steak as
well.
Rule number 2 on the steak, is to give it
a good seasoning. When I talk about seasoning
Iím talking about salt and pepper. If you
wanted to do some other kind of spice, you
know chili powder, cumin, whatever you want,
absolutely you can do it, but that salt and
pepper is critical. And again itís influenced
by knowing your meat. If youíve got a thicker
piece, like this you need more seasoning,
to carry all the way through the piece, if
youíve got a thinner piece, you can get away
with less.
I like to use kosher salt, because its got
a thicker grain to it and it kind of sticks
to the meat better, and then I use fresh ground
pepper as well. I give that seasoning a good
press down into the meat as well, and you
want to season both sides. Itís important
to season both sides, again because youíve
got a big piece of meat here, and who knows,
you may cut it in half while youíre eating
it, and only get one sided seasoned taste
in your mouth and you donít want that. You
can be pretty generous, especially with a
steak this size, because of a bunch of the
seasoning is going to fall off, either in
the pan or on the grill, however youíre cooking
it. Once you get it seasoned, weíre ready
to sear it off.
Ok letís talk aboutÖwhat are we on, fourth,
fifth, sixthÖthe third rule of great steak
cooking, and that is getting a great sear.
This might be the scariest part for a lot
of people, because you gotta go with a pan
that is really blistering hot. If youíre
outside on the grill, same principles apply.
You want to get the grill as hot as possible.
You know a nice little test, Iíve got a bowl
of water here, and itís a dry plan, and I
just put a bit of water in there, and see
how it dances around the pan? Thatís what
youíre looking for. The pan is super super
hot, the pan should probably be smoking just
a little bit, and certainly itís going to
start smoking once I put this oil in it. I
want to make sure that the water is out of
the pan before I put the oil in it. Oil and
water donít mix well. Iím going to go ahead
and put a good couple drizzles in there, make
sure I have the bottom coated, you can see
the smoke coming off the pan. Thatís what
weíre looking for. And you should hear a
lot of noise once we drop our steak in.
[sizzling]
So that noise is exactly what weíre looking
for. That the sear on the steak, and itís
going to get that nice tasty crust on the
outside and itís obviously going to cook
the piece of meat. So the key factor here,
in addition to a hot pan, is really not flipping
the meat. Notice Iím not going in there and
moving things around or even really shaking
the pan. It wonít stick, donít worry about
it. After 4 minutes, Iím going to say for
this piece of steak, Iím going to go ahead
and flip it over. Weíre going to so the same
thing on the other side. All at full heat,
as high as it can go. And then weíre going
to finish it off in the oven.
Ok, my 4th rule on cooking a great steak,
is all about doneness. You gotta know, personally,
how well you like your steak done. Are you
a raw person, are you a well done person?
Iím probably in the middle, medium rare,
I like to lean towards rare rather than lean
towards well done. But frankly itís up to
you. Now thereís two good ways I know about
to tell doneness. One is to use a meat thermometer.
I like to use this kind, you know, that has
a nice long string attached to it, and the
read out over here, so you can stick this
in the meat, and have this outside of the
oven. Once you get to the desired temperature,
you can pop it out. I donít particularly
like the kind where, well I guess, itís more
a use than a kind of thermometer. I donít
like the technique of testing it, pulling
the thermometer out, waiting a few minutes,
testing it again, creating new holes in the
meat. Thatís really just puncturing the meat
and driving the juice out of the steak. If
youíre going to use one, put it in and leave
it alone until you get to the right doneness.
Like I said, for me Iíll put it out probably
125, maybe between 125 and 130, for a nice
medium rare. Lots of temperature tables out
on the internet you can find one pretty easily.
The other way to test doneness is to use the
firmness of the meat technique. Let me show
you on my hand. So the firmer a piece of meat
feels when you tap it, the more well done
it is. The more it gives, the less well done
it is, the more on the rare side it is. So
a simple test to get used to it, is to use
a finger technique here by rotating you finger,
you touch your index finger and this puts
kinda the least tension on this little paw
part of your hand here. And that generally
equates to a rare piece of meat. If you go
to the middle finger, youíll notice it gets
a little firmer, and we start getting into
a medium piece of meat. Now you go to the
ring finger, firmer yet. All the way to the
pinky, if you feel that, itís pretty darn
tight right here, and this is ah, essentially,
kinda the feel of a well done piece of meat.
I think itís a little tough to gauge this,
and then test the meat, and then go like that.
The point is more just to get you familiar
with how softness and the feel of the meat
vary with the temperature. And then the first
few times you cook a steak, or maybe use one
of these thermometers, feel it as you go along
and remember what those different feelings
are like so that you can replicate it over
time. You definitely want to make sure your
steak is done to the right temperature, that
is a key factor.
Okay, my steak has been searing for about
4 minutes now, and this is why I say it can
be scary, you can see all the smoke coming
off the pan. If youíve got a hood oven, or
a hood vent, you should probably turn it on.
The pan is starting to look a little crusty
on the outside, but we flip it over, and itís
absolutely fine. Youíve got, Youíve got
that nice char on the outside, all the fat
is kinda of rendered off, and burnt off, which
is absolutely what weíre looking for. And
yet that center is still going to be nice
and pink when we cut it. So I went ahead and
turned this over, and the other side is going
to sear off. And while it does that, to finish
cooking, it would take a really long time,
and weíd have to a few flips, and I donít
really like to flip meat, or steaks around
a whole lot. I generally do one side, then
flip it around, do the other side, and thatís
pretty much it. Iím going to go ahead and
take this, put it into a 400 degree oven,
and itís probably going to take about another
8 minutes or so for this side to get it to
the doneness I want. You can either, like
I said, either use the meat thermometer, or
start using the old feel test.
Ok, so I just pulled the steak out of the
oven, and the ah final rule in the five rule
plan, is to let the steak rest. Iíve got
some aluminum foil here, Iím going to go
ahead and drop the steak on there, and then
wrap it up. Resting the steak you know allows
all the juices in there to you know to just
kinda relax and cool down a little bit. The
foil will actually keep the steak kinda hot.
But if you cut into it now, everything just
kinda runs off onto the plate, and you actually
end up with dry steak, even if itís uh to
the proper doneness, rare, medium rareÖuh
doneness. So go ahead wrap it up, steak this
size at least 5 minutes, you know up to 10
is totally fine. You can keep it in a warm
part of the kitchen, maybe top of the stove.
You donít want it on direct heat because
it will continue to cook.
Ok, I just removed my steak, from the foil,
let it rest. By the way, the juice that collects
in here, if youíve got a sauce going I would
definitely add that, it is absolutely awesome.
And then you can go ahead and serve your steak
any way you want. You can serve it whole,
give the whole piece to somebody, or go ahead
and slice it like Iím doing, and just serve
up a few pieces at a time. Let me grab a little
plate here. And we got a perfectly cooked,
a little piece of ribeye here. Make a little
tower eh, why not? Go ahead with our side
dishes around the steak. I see you next time
on www.noreciperequired.com.