Fasting and the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem

Fasting and the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem

August 7, 2019 100 By William Morgan


Hello everyone
Did you know nnly HALF the insulin your body makes each day is made because of the food you eat.
What about the other 50%?
You’ve changed the food, but you’re not seeing
the results you hoped for. If that’s you,
then let me tell you about The 50% Percent
Insulin Problem and what you can do about
it.
Hello, this is old Butter Bob Briggs,
I lost 145 pounds and made a video about how
I did it called “Butter Makes Your Pants
Fall Off”
and you can watch that here on my Youtube
channel.
But, in this video I want to talk to you about
how HALF the insulin your body makes, and
yes I said HALF the insulin, fifty percent
of the daily insulin your body produces has
nothing to do with the food you eat.
I call this The Fifty Percent Insulin Problem.
Look, everyone in the low carb community understands
if you eat a high carb meal, or a snack cake,
or even worse, one of those big belly washing
soft drinks, your insulin will go WAY UP fast.
The message seems so simple.
Carbs drive insulin and insulin drives obesity.
Cut the carbs, reduce the insulin and lose
the weight.
Such a simple message, but is that the whole
story?
The idea that carbs increase insulin is true,
and for some simply cutting the carbs they
eat is enough to solve their problem.
But for others, maybe even for you, this might
not be enough, because HALF your insulin problem
is not an eating problem.
So changing what you eat alone, might not
be enough to reverse it.
You might need to an add another strategy.
In this video I want you to see a side of
this insulin problem that isn’t very well
known.
I call this the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem
I want to very quickly, show you a study that
will explain what this problem is.
Below you can see the name of the study
In this study they looked at insulin levels
throughout the day in a group of people, half
the people were fat, the other half thin.
They tested these people’s insulin after 10
hours of sleeping and not eating and came
up with the lowest level of constant insulin
these people always have in their system,
they called this the “Basal insulin secretion
rate”, but I’m going to call it their “Fasting
Insulin” because whenever you see this number
in a study, they call it the “fasting insulin”.
In other words, this fasting insulin number
is a marker that tells us the minimum constant
level of insulin that’s always circulating
in your blood regardless of whether you’re
eating or not eating, it’s always there.
You see, your body releases a certain amount
of insulin all day long, it happens while
you’re eating and even when you’re not eating,
even when you’re sleeping, and how high or
how low this constant minimum level of insulin
is, can best be tested after an overnight
fast.
This fasting insulin level could be thought
of as the floor or the lowest constant level
of insulin, while your level after eating
could be thought of as jumping up to the ceiling,
or the highest temporary level.
We all know our insulin jumps up to the ceiling
a few times a day but these high levels are
temporary and they depend on what we’ve been
eating.
On the other hand, the fasting level of insulin
is constantly present, like the floor, it
is the ground you stand on all the time.
And this constant background level of insulin,
this floor you stand on, this fasting insulin,
tends to be much higher for fat people than
for thin people.
Now here’s the reason I’m telling you about
this stuff.
They tested the day’s total insulin to see
what percentage of it happened after eating
and what percentage of it was this constant
background amount.
And do you know what they found?
They found that this constant background level
of insulin, this floor that your insulin never
goes below, represented between 45 to 50%
of the TOTAL insulin you produce each day.
About HALF of the insulin you produce each
day is this constant background pool of insulin
you always have circulating, regardless of
whether you’re eating or not.
Fifty Percent of the insulin released each
day is released as a constant background level,
regardless of how fat or how thin you are.
This Fifty Percent Insulin Problem is happening
all through the day and this is not dependent
on what you’re eating.
The skinny people had a lower constant background
level, they had a lower floor, on average,
but this was still about HALF of the insulin
they produced each day.
The fat people had a higher constant background
level, on average, but this was still about
HALF of the insulin they produced each day.
This is the fifty percent insulin problem.
And if HALF of your daily insulin is higher
than it should be, and it probably is, if
you’re fat around the middle, then HALF the
problem you have with insulin is not caused
by what you eat alone.
And if HALF the insulin you produce is not
caused by the food you eat, then simply changing
your food alone may not be enough to fix this
problem.
And I think that many people who have not
been successful losing weight with a low carb
diet alone, have found this out the hard way.
If this 50% insulin problem is not related
to food, what is it related to?
The answer is –
It is directly associated with how fat you
are.
As you can see from these graphs from several
other studies, the fatter you are, the higher
your fasting insulin level.
The higher your fasting insulin level, the
more background insulin you have all day long.
And the sad news is this, some people have
higher insulin even when they are NOT EATING,
than normal people have AFTER they eat.
Just look at this graph from the work of Dr.
Joseph Kraft.
These people have a fasting insulin rate that
is HIGHER than normal people have, EVEN AFTER
they eat.
Is it any wonder why some people find losing
weight almost impossible even on a low carb
diet?
Especially if they try to solve their 50%
insulin problem by changing what they eat
alone, but not changing when they eat, and
we’ll talk about that more in a couple minutes.
As you’ll see before the end of this video,
changing when you eat is MORE effective at
attacking this 50% insulin problem, than changing
what you eat alone.
This Fifty Percent Insulin Problem happens
all the time, but as we’re about to see, the
higher that background insulin is, the higher
your insulin goes after eating.
So even though the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem
is not about food, it does effect how high
your insulin spikes after you eat.
As you’ll see, in this study published many
years before the one we just talked about,
they found your insulin levels after you eat
are likely to rise 5 to 7 times higher, by
one hour after eating, than whatever your
fasting insulin level was.
If you’re diabetic or prediabetic the spike
is likely to come two hours after eating.
They found whatever your fasting insulin number
is, after you eat, your body will release
an amount of insulin an average of 5 to 7
times higher than whatever that level of constant
background insulin is.
Remember these are averages, for some the
spike could be much higher or a little lower.
But the important thing to remember is this
– the spike in insulin after you eat is based
on how high or how low your fasting insulin
levels are.
To make this a little more clear, let’s look
at an example with some real numbers.
If a person has a fasting insulin level of
say 8 microunits.
After that person eats, their insulin will
spike an average of 5 to 7 times higher.
Their AFTER eating insulin will rise to an
average level of between 45 to 56 microunits,
which is within the normal range.
They ate a meal, but because their fasting
insulin number was fairly low, their after
eating numbers stayed in the fairly normal
range.
But lets say a person had a high fasting insulin
level of 30 microunits. First, that person
is likely to be fat if they have a number
that high, and so, after that fat person with
a fasting number of 30 eats the SAME meal
the skinny person ate, their insulin would
rise to 150 to 210 microunits, which is 5
to 7 times higher than that fat person’s fasting
insulin number, but more than that, it is
is 3 times higher than the skinny persons,
who just ate the exact same food.
Both people ate the same meal, but the higher
the constant background insulin, or what we’re
calling the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem,
the higher their insulin spiked after eating.
Both of these people had a spike after eating,
which is normal, but because the 50% insulin
problem was much higher in the fat person,
their insulin jumped to a level three times
higher than the thin person’s who ate the
same food that they did.
By the way, I found this to be true for myself
when I took an insulin/glucose tolerance test
in October of 2015. Since being normal weight,
I have a fasting insulin level of about 3
microunits and after taking a glucose test
my insulin level rose to 18 which is about
a 6 fold increase. Then by the third hour
I was back down to the 3 microunits of my
fasting insulin level.
Let’s sum up what we know:
Some foods like carbs and lean processed protein,
like whey protein powders, cause your insulin
to go very high after eating, but this insulin
only amounts to 50% of your insulin problem.
What you eat determines this number, so when
you eat low carb, you keep this number lower.
The other 50% of your daily insulin is associated
with how fat you are.
It is an insulin problem and the best way
to solve it is to periodically hold insulin
very very low, as low as possible and this
low insulin will allow us to begin burning
up that extra body fat around your belly,
your butt and your chinny, chin chins.
The association between how fat you are and
how high your constant background insulin
levels are, could be pictured as an internal
fat thermostat which has been called the “body
set weight”.
In other words, the higher the fasting insulin
level, that constant background insulin that
we’ve been talking about, then however high
or low that rate is, will determine how high
your insulin spikes after eating.
All these things are like a thermostat, a
thermostat that sets how much fat the body
holds onto.
The more insulin, the higher the body “sets”
your fat weight thermostat.
If insulin levels cause the body to set the
amount of fat you carry to a certain level,
then the question becomes, could you turn
down that thermostat by lowering and keeping
low your constant background insulin levels?
I think the obvious answer is YES.
And if you want to turn down this thermostat,
you need use the most effective strategy you
can find to get insulin down as low as possible
and hold it there as often as possible.
And when I say as often as possible, I’m talking
about adding an element of TIMING to the Low
Carb idea.
The Low Carb idea is about what to eat and
what not to eat to keep insulin low, but what
I’m talking about is not about what to eat,
it is about the TIMING of eating.
Not eating for a period of time, even a short
period like 16 to 24 hours, is very effective
at lowering insulin.
A Short Fast actually lowers insulin BETTER
than Low Carb and it’s cheap, it’s simple
and best of all, not eating for short periods
of time is NATURE’S way to balance the books.
Low Carb High Fat is great because in many
ways, it imitates fasting, and Low Carb is
very effective at lowering insulin.
But fasting is the real deal, because any
eating raises insulin, no matter what you
eat.
Low Carb foods are great at keeping the after
eating insulin spike lower, but a short 16
to 24 hour fast is fifty percent more effective
than even Low Carb at lowering insulin. And
the most sustainable strategy you can take
is – combining them into a two front attack
on your problem, low carb high fat eating,
combined with and followed by, fasting for
short 16 to 24 hours periods is powerful.
So what does fasting do?
Fasting 24 hours every other day has been
shown to increase how sensitive your body
is to insulin.
Being more sensitive to something is easily
understood by thinking of how alcohol effects
you, if you aren’t used to drinking. Just
one or two drinks and you’ll really feel it.
The same for insulin, if you become more sensitive,
then a little insulin will do the job it takes
a lot to do now.
If your body is more sensitive, then you need
less insulin to get the same job done.
In the short time of just 22 days of fasting
every other day, people became SEVEN times
more sensitive to insulin.
Seven times more sensitive.
Just fasting every other day for about 3 weeks,
makes you seven times more sensitive to insulin,
folks this is amazing stuff.
And it get’s better, on the every other fasting
day, their fasting insulin was 57% lower.
That’s a lowering of the background insulin
and a lowering of the 50% insulin problem
every other day by over HALF, by almost 60%.
And this not eating every other day, increased
the body’s fat burning by 58%.
That 58% increase in fat burning is freaking
amazing.
That’s your belly being burned up at a rate
almost 60% higher.
And I want to point something out about this
study that these graphs come from – the people
in this study who were fasting every other
day, were NOT EATING LOW CARB on their eating
days.
They were eating whatever the heck they wanted,
so you can just imagine how much lower their
insulin would have been if they had eaten
a low carb diet on their eating day.
Just image how much faster their results would
have been, if they had held their insulin
lower even on their eating days.
In another study, not eating carbohydrates
at all for three days lowered insulin 48%.
But not eating anything for three days, or
fasting, lowered insulin by a whopping 69%.
As you can see, Low carb is great, but fasting
is almost 50% better than low carb at lowering
your insulin.
And this one – two punch of eating LCHF during
eating times and then short 16 to 24 hour
fasts is the strategy I used and the one I
recommend to you.
No other strategy is more effective. And it
is more sustainable. This is something you
can do long-term folks.
As we’ve seen, not eating for three days lowered
insulin almost 70%, but fasting that long
might be too hard for some people to do,
but the good news is, two-thirds of that 70%
reduction in insulin over a three day fast,
is achieved in the first 24 hours. In other
words, if three days of fasting makes your
insulin go down 70%, the good news is, during
the first day of that fast, 70% of all the
insulin reduction is already happened.
So even a 24 hour fast reduces insulin almost
as much as a 3 day fast could do and a short
24 hour fast from dinner time today until
dinner time tomorrow is really easy to do
and much more sustainable long term than a
long 3 day fast.
Just look what happens during a short fast.
After just 11 hours, fatty acids, this is
your fat being released folks, fatty acids
being released are GREATLY increased. Just
look at that steep rise around 11 hours. That’s
your big belly slowly but surely being burned
up with a little fasting time each day.
After just 13 hours, ketones are greatly increased.
As you know, ketones are made from your body
fat and used by the body as a substitute energy
source.
Everybody in the low carb world worries about
whether or not they are in ketosis, but as
you can see, after 13 hours ketones are greatly
increasing. You are making ketones while fasting.
And these ketones can continue to rise higher
and higher for days so long as the fast continues.
Longer fasts have a higher rate of ketones,
but you don’t have to do long fasts, simply
do a good 16 to 24 hour fast and know the
ketones are on a steep rise after 13 hours.
And Insulin falls a lot by 3 to 4 hours after
eating and then falls even further by 10 hours
after eating.
Remember, 70% of the fall in insulin during
a long fast, a three day fast, happens during
the first 24 hours.
So most the insulin reduction that happens
in a long fast, happens during your short
fast.
So eat a LCHF diet during eating times and
use the complete appetite control that diet
gives you to not eat when not hungry, this
not eating when not hungry is fasting.
It’s easy to do, you’re already doing it now
when you sleep, all you need to do is extend
the time. Delaying eating breakfast for a
few hours can give you a 16 hour fast and
most of that time you were asleep. Easy.
Now, a video like this can’t go into all the
benefits of fasting, so if you want to really
learn about intermittent fasting, the most
complete source of information, and I mean
THE most complete source, can be found on
Dr. Jason Fung’s excellent blog. He has
an huge free 26 part blog series about fasting
that is a wealth of information on this topic.
There simply is not a better resource about
this on the internet and here’s the link.
Thank you for watching and I hope this helps
you. While you’re here on Youtube, I hope
you’ll watch some of my other videos, or visit
me on Facebook or visit my blog at www.buttermakesyourpantsfalloff.com