Comparing Different Autoimmune Diets – AIP, Whole 30, SCD, Keto etc

Comparing Different Autoimmune Diets – AIP, Whole 30, SCD, Keto etc

August 5, 2019 6 By William Morgan


Hi guys, I’m Erica. Welcome to hack your
health! In today’s video I’m gonna
compare different diets that are used
for autoimmune diseases, and my goal with
this is to just kind of highlight the
similarities and the differences between
these diets because there’s certain
foods that are excluded from all of them
which then tells you that these are
maybe the most important foods to avoid,
and then there’s other foods which are
included in some and excluded in others,
and this might be helpful for people who
are either on one of the diets and are
still having problems these could be
some foods that it’s good to start with
first when it comes to removing things,
or for people who are reintroducing
foods it might be helpful to start with
those that are included on other
diets as the first ones that they
introduced because those could be the
most likely to be received well by
people with autoimmune diseases. I also
thought it might be helpful to compare
these different diets because for people
who are just first starting to learn
about using diets to improve their
autoimmune symptoms, I thought that it
might be helpful to start understanding
the reasons underlying these diets and
that would kind of empower people to
make good choices for themselves. As
usual this is not medical advice. I’m not
a doctor and this is just to help other
people who are doing research, and I’ll
put as many references as I can in the
description box so that you can go and
read more about these things yourself
and choose what seems to make the most
sense to you. And I also might be biased
because I did the specific carbohydrate
diet myself and it worked for me. The
other diets,
I didn’t specifically do those diets
although they are very similar to what I
did. But yeah, that’s the one that worked
for me so that’s the one I’ll have the
most knowledge about. So the diets that
I’m going to compare are the autoimmune
Paleo diet the whole 30 diet, the
specific carbohydrate diet, and then
just go into a little bit about the
Paleo and keto diets and then veganism
and the carnivore diet. So there’s quite
a few so I won’t try and spend too long
on each one but rather just give a
general overview of that diet and what
it’s trying to accomplish, and what it
includes and excludes and then we can
compare them. So the autoimmune Paleo
diet is basically a strict version of
paleo. I have notes so if I
look down I’m looking at my notes. So it
includes meat, vegetables, sweet potatoes,
fruit in small quantities
maximum two to three per day, fermented
foods, honey and maple syrup, fresh non
seed herbs, so this diet excludes all
seeds, it includes bone broth, vinegar,
avocade oil, coconut oil, olive oil,
and lard are the facts that allowed, and
string beans and snap peas are also
allowed. So what’s excluded are
nightshades,
grains, rice, oats, wheat, quinoa, all those.
Dairy, eggs, legumes, beans and peanuts are included in legumes, sugars,
processed foods, butter and ghee, all oils
except for the ones mentioned, food
additives, alcohol, soy, onions, white
potatoes, goji berries randomly, and
pepper based spices. And I’m pretty sure
the reason why pepper based spices are
excluded is because those are night
shades like cayenne pepper and black
pepper
are also night shades. The basic concept
of this is to just remove anything that
could be triggering an autoimmune
response, basically, and to go back to how
our ancestors would have eaten. So, to eat
a diet that’s more resembling a diet
that the human body would have adapted
to during evolution. A lot of things
that we eat
nowadays are things that
didn’t exist before maybe a few hundred
years ago, or even more recently in the
case of processed foods. So the idea
behind this diet my understanding is
that your immune system is probably more
likely to be triggered by those newer,
more unfamiliar foods, and is probably
more likely to be calm in response to
foods that are foods that your body can
easily identify, digest, and otherwise
deal with. The whole 30 diet, so far as I
could tell basically it included the
exact same things as this autoimmune
Paleo diet for all intents and purposes.
They made a little bit more distinction
about fruit juice being included, but to
me the main difference between the two
was how they were implemented so I’ll
get that in the next section of the
video. One other distinction between
the two is that butter and ghee are
allowed in the whole 30 but
not allowed in the Paleo autoimmune, and
in the whole 30 there’s a specific rule
against eating foods that are a
recreation of foods that you’re not
allowed to eat. So an example of that
would be using coconut flour to make a
muffin or another kind of baked good
that’s not allowed, so the whole 30
specifically says you’re not allowed to
do that whereas with AIP it just goes
into the foods themselves and not
necessarily specifics on what you use
them to make. But other than that these
two in terms of the food list seem to be
almost identical. So then we have the
specific carbohydrate diet, and this diet
focuses more on the kind of carbohydrate
that is in
food and it basically tries to remove
complex carbohydrates. And the reason for
that is because those provide the most
food for the bacteria in your gut which
in the case of people with autoimmune
diseases is often wreaking havoc and it
also excludes all refined sugars. So with
the specific carbohydrate diet you can’t
eat sweet potatoes or potatoes or any of
the grains, so any of the sugars, any of
the food additives or processed foods, so
it’s very similar to the AIP
Paleo and the main differences are that
on the specific carbohydrate diet, milk
is allowed as long as it is either
butter is allowed, or fermented milk. So
anything where the lactose is broken
down. So that means that you can have the
specific yogurt that you make yourself,
not store but store-bought yogurt, as
well as cheeses that are true cheeses,
that are you know fermented and so that
means that the lactose is very low. So
since the focus is on the kind of
carbohydrate in the food, that makes
those fermented milk products acceptable.
And for seeds and legumes,
those are excluded at the beginning of
the diet but technically they are
allowed just after a longer period of
time. Another major difference it is eggs.
Eggs are allowed on the specific
carbohydrate diet, but not on the Paleo
AIP diet. But for the most part there are
a lot of similarities and I’ll get into
why I think there are some differences
later. Yeah, so that’s the basics of the
specific carbohydrate diet and if you
want to have a list of all the foods
that are illegal and illegal I’ll put
that in the description box because
they’re very specific from food to food
which ones are and are not allowed. So
then we have the vegan diet which when
you google autoimmune diet you seem to
get a lot of vegan results so that’s why
I included it. So in a vegan diet
obviously
excluding all animal products and all
animal related products like honey and
stuff like that. So veganism in my
perspective is a fast, simply because it
is arguably impossible to get balanced
nutrition on a vegan diet because of the
nutritional deficiencies. And if you want
to know more about those you can watch
my “is veganism really healthy” video, because
I went more in depth about it there. But
people do have good results some of the
time on a short term vegan diet so I
think it’s worth including. However, on a
long term basis I personally think that
veganism is quite dangerous. As well,
because it has so much fiber and so much
plant compounds that can be difficult
for people with autoimmune diseases to
handle, I think that this one really
stands out from the others. It really
involves a lot of carbohydrates, for
example, and starches, because without
meat and dairy and or at least meat,
you end up having to get a lot of
calories from plant sources and the
plant energy is for the most part
carbohydrates. So for the rest of this
video, I am probably going to not focus
so much on the vegan diet since its kind
of an outlier here and basically I would
say that you can do your own research
about that one and just to be very
careful with it. And then we have the
carnivore diet. So the carnivore diet I
see as sort of the ultimate autoimmune
diet, basically because it seems like
people who can’t tolerate the most foods
could potentially end up on the
carnivore diet purely through
exclusion, and of course Makayla Peterson
would be the time example of that. So I
think that it’s worth including because
you never know how severe- I mean I’m
making this video for people with autoimmune
diseases, and I don’t know how severe
each person’s autoimmune disease is
who’s watching this, and it’s possible
that there are others who are so
responsive and reactive to different
kinds of plant food that the only thing
they’re left with is this kind of beef
and water diet, and I think that it’s
important for that to be presented in a
way that you know if that ends up being
the case you’re not crazy. However, I
think that that’s probably not necessary
for the vast majority of people with
autoimmune diseases, and just think that
it deserves to be included since it’s
worked for such extreme cases that were
not responding fully to things like a
paleo or an AIP or specific carbohydrate
diet. So there’s some other really
important differences that I see between
these diets, and in particular when you compare the specific
carbohydrate diet with the AIP or the
whole 30 diet, and that is the length of
time that they’re meant to be done for.
so the specific carbohydrate diet is
meant to be strictly followed without
any exceptions for one to three years if
you’re looking at Crohn’s. And it’s used
for different diseases like celiac or
IBD or for autistic children and
schizophrenia and other seemingly random
diseases that do have a very strong
digestive component, so there’s different
lengths of time recommended for
different uses of the diet. But for
crohn’s disease, what I had, it’s one to
three years. So this is meant to be a
really long term diet that really
starves and completely changes
microbiome, and the theory behind doing
it for such a long time is that if you
reintroduce a food too soon,
the bacteria or whatever underlying
thing that’s causing the disease could
still be present and then by feeding it
you could flare your symptoms. So I think
that that has to do with why the milk
and the cheese and the legumes are
included on this diet, because things
like legumes and seeds in particular are
meant to be reintroduced after
approximately three months, so they
aren’t meant to be at the very beginning,
they’re after a certain period of
healing has occurred. Whereas the AIP
diet is suggested to be done for about
two to three weeks and then
reintroducing a food every two to three
days after that to see how the body
responds to it. So I think that by
looking at the specific carbohydrate
diet people who are doing the AIP
can have a really good like a good idea
of which foods to introduce first
because for example eggs are included on
a specific carbohydrate diet but not the
AIP so after that two to three weeks
maybe eggs would be a good choice to
introduce first, because there by that
logic they’re less likely to cause reaction
and the whole thirty is only meant to be
done for thirty days. So far as I can
tell there’s no reintroduction period
it’s really just a 30-day program and so
my personal sense would be that for a
person with a very severe autoimmune
disease, for them to go back to doing the
same or similar things that they were
doing before it their problems would
likely come back after thirty days. So I
think the duration of time is a very
important factor and it has to do with,
yes on the AIP you can introduce these
certain foods wait a few days to
if it’s going to cause a response and if
it doesn’t keep it in the diet and if it
does exclude it and then I feel like
that would have to be a long-term diet
in order to work, and same thing with the
specific carbohydrate diet it’s meant to
be done for a long period of time. So
then there’s keto and paleo which are
more considered like lifestyle diets
which have no specific end date and
basically paleo is very similar to the AIP diet, which is a version of paleo.
And then keto focuses on reducing the
number of carbohydrates in the diet to
approximately 50 or less grams of
carbohydrate per day to keep the body in
ketosis, and it’s more focused on weight
loss. So I feel like it would be better
for a person with an autoimmune disease
to focus more on including foods that
affect their body and their symptoms in
a certain way, not necessarily on how
many grams of carbohydrates they’re
eating in that day, but more so on the
kind of symptoms they’re experiencing. So
that’s why I felt like keto and paleo,
though they’re really similar and great,
might not be specific enough to
autoimmune diseases, and have a slightly
different kind of purpose. So even though
I think there can be great success on
those, the kind of guiding principles of
the AIP or the specific carbohydrate
diet might be more useful in the sense
of really watching for symptoms. So some
of the commonalities between these diets
that we can see are nightshades,
although the nightshades are
technically allowed on a specific
carbohydrate diet, it’s kind of a caution
area and they are excluded from the
other diets. Legumes, once again they’re
included after about three months on the
specific
carbohydrate diet if tolerated and they
are excluded from the whole 30 and the
AIP.
So this would be a area to watch out for.
Grains are excluded on all of these
diets except for veganism, which we’re
not including right now, so grains are a
real problem for many many people with
autoimmune diseases, and same with sugars,
preservatives, emulsifiers, and other
elements of processed foods are are
excluded from all of these as well and
those can also have effects on the
intestines and its permeability so those
are very important to avoid for people
who are trying to heal leaky gut as a
source of their autoimmune issues. Nuts
and seeds are another common exclusion,
which again on the specific carbohydrate
diet it suggests you could try
reintroducing them after three months
and see if they’re okay. If they’re okay,
then you can include them, and if they’re
not okay then obviously you shouldn’t.
And on the AIP they are excluded. And of
course the main differences are the
dairy, the eggs, and the reintroduction
practices with these diets. So I think
that these are really helpful guiding
principles for people who are adjusting
their diet to deal with an autoimmune
diseases, and in my experience and
personal opinion keeping a food journal
is a really important step at the
beginning. I kept a food journal for
thirty days when I first started the
specific carbohydrate diet and basically
that was just to find foods that were
legal on the diet but were not good for
me. So I would highly suggest doing that.
And there are also certain molecules
that are found in some
plant foods that can be irritating to
people with autoimmune or leaky gut
issues, so those are things like phytates,
lectins, oxalates, and fiber. And I think
what I’m gonna do is make seperate
videos on those topics because it’s kind
of beyond the length that I’d like to
make this video, but if you’re having
trouble on any of these diets I would
suggest keeping really close track of
the individual foods that you’re eating,
whether you’re eating them cooked or raw,
and basically pay really close attention
to those foods because sometimes it
might be the case that there’s just one
or two or three things that you’re
including in the diet which might be
causing symptoms and by removing those
you could just be having a way easier
time. So I really hope that this video
has been helpful to you and please share
in the comments if you’ve tried any of
these diets, or if you’re currently doing
them what your experience has been and
which foods have worked and not worked
and anything else that you would like to
share. And if you’re just being diagnosed
with an autoimmune disease and you’re
looking into diet I would just say that
I’m very excited for you and I wish you
all the best and encouragement, and in my
case during this was definitely the best
choice that I could have made and the
reason why I make videos about it is
basically because I hope that other
people will have hope and even though
it’s very hard I really hope that you
can find foods that work for you. And all
the best on your healing journey, and
thank you so much for watching. If you
like this video, please let me know by
pushing like, and if you want to see more
of my health-related videos then you can
always subscribe. Thank you! Bye