Coconut Oil & MCTs; Miracle (Bruce Fife) or Risk(AHA)?

Coconut Oil & MCTs; Miracle (Bruce Fife) or Risk(AHA)?

August 8, 2019 100 By William Morgan


In June of 2017
the American Heart Association published what they call – A Presidential Advisory
from the American Heart Association Regarding Dietary Fats and
Cardiovascular Disease. In this report that month they stated unequivocally
they do not recommend coconut oil. This was just the latest in a long
– multiple decades-long battle around coconut .I’ve had my own battles
personally about coconut oil. I I loved coconut when I was a kid. My mom
and my grandmother (who I grew up with) – both knew that my favorite birthday
dessert was coconut – coconut pie, coconut cake … Yes. we had too much of a culture
around desserts! That’s a different story for a different time. However the
scientific community has been battling over coconut oil for a long time as well.
When I grew up, became a physician and then started teaching prevention, I found
out that coconut oil was saturated. Saturated oils were supposed to be
bad. I stopped taking coconut oil & had it very, very rarely.
Now here’s an interesting twist. Though this is this was some of the argument
and criticism of the American Heart Association advice – that you would expect
to see. I saw this as I was looking at doing research for this video and I
thought, ” oh boy – here comes another emotional – more heat
than light – anger around this issue…” but boy was I surprised. This blogger won
me over. Her name is Hilda Bastian. She does do public citizen’s research in
Australia. She’s done it here in the US. She’s been a an epidemiologist for the
National Institute of Health. And actually it’s some fairly high level (work she’s done).
She’s actually been a founding member of the Cochrane Association. That’s sort of
like the National . – I mean the global – Wikipedia for science. This is part of
the PLoS Public Library of Science. It’s frustrating (dealing with issues like coconut oil). I think as an
epidemiologist (she’s a comedian about epidemiology as well) and
I think she’s she tends to deal with a lot of the issues that are that we’re
dealing with- like coconut oil for example. ABSOLUTELY MAYBE. now What she criticized the American Heart Association for was : number 1: bias –
there were financial ties in that organization. They devoted a page (a whole page!) to
their financial biases. But that wasn’t all. There was a selection of studies –
there was no list of the studies that they looked at! #2 – the second one was applying
different criteria to different studies So again this lady’s an excellent epidemiologist.
I actually trust some of her review of the AHA’s work more than
the AHA’s board. But let’s go on and look at some
different issues around coconut oil. Who’s right? Here’s the Center
for Science in the Public Interest – the public interest group. You would
think, ” well maybe they’re going to not have any political ties. ” Wrong!. It’s been
around for a couple of decade. They’ve been embroiled -they spend their
life embroiled in political battles. Now their perspective is there are a lot of
myths that persist about coconut oil – like “the myth” that you can lose weight, that it helps you
lose weight. Well again I mean that may be a little bit harsh it does
help you lose weight if it helps you to decrease caloric intake. Maybe
compared to some diets. It also depends on how much coconut oil. Myth
number 2: coconut oil is good for the heart and myth number 3: cooking with it
all protects you from dementia. I would agree that there is – a point behind
those statements being myths. I don’t think – the jury’s still out – though I do
think that there’s still arguable points about this. This is a
meta-analysis from the British Medical Journal. It’s Open Heart –
which is the open source web version of the British Medical Journal section
concentrating on cardiovascular disease. They had several points here. They’re
looking at MCTs – the medium chain fatty acids or triglycerides. They’re
saying that they do seem to help compared to the long chains. However
they’re also saying – look – they may have limited help – limited
pathogenicity (danger) but also limited help. They said, ” You know what- you can use these but it’s not going to be a super-duper cure. “This is a very
interesting article to me. If you’re a vegan. Maybe even if your own animal eater, you may
want to shut your ears for this part.. This is where they’re doing some ..the
authors of this study are – this is the Asian Australian (Australasian)
Journal of Animal Science. They’re talking about
carcass composition and serum lipid in male broilers (in other words chickens)
they’re growing to take to market. The point here
was they said, “Yes. What you do need – if you have too much soybean oil in the
diet of these chickens, they’ll have too much fat in their body.
You want to decrease the soybean oil by 75% with coconut oil. I mean if these
guys are doing that to decrease body fat content in broilers , it does make you
wonder. If you start studying the coconut oil debate, you’ll
hear that CIS fats are good and TRANS fats are
bad. What are those? These are the fatty acids. This is the acid part this
is the carbon chain on it. Now sis and trans fats have a – this is called an
unsaturated area. If you have hydrogen ions on every one of these – then it’s a
saturated fat. CIS it’s supposed to be good. It creates the kink and makes it bent -the molecule bent. TRANS – they’re
saying are bad. So which is coconut oil? Neither!
Again the point is this gets to be a complicated, detailed argument. I just
went through that a minute ago. This is a saturated fat. This is what coconut oil
is. These are CIS – I believe this is a CIS – oh yes this is a CIS fat.
This is a TRANS fat. There’s been arguments long ago that Public Interest
Science Group – one of their major battles was to get regulation to get saturated
fats out of the American diet – Then to get
trans fats out of the American dieT. There’s some argument about going back
to saturated fats. The difference here is – there’s an acid called lauric
acid – it’s what’s called a medium chain fatty acid. Let me
show you what medium and short chains are. This is about 17 carbons in the
chain. That’s a long chain fatty acid. When you have 12 or more – I think it’s like
12 to 8. I’m not sure of the exact number But those are short chain fatty acids.
Just to complete the loop on that if you hook these three together with a
glycerin molecule – you will get a triglyceride – the blood fats (in a blood “cholesterol” test panel.) You take
that glycerin off. You start digesting this & you get ketosis. (Which diabetics
do because they can’t burn sugar very well.)You also want to get ketosis early
on in your low-carb diet because you’re not burning sugar. We actually burn – or
create ketones every time we burn fat. Now this is a meta-analyses
regarding coconut oil consumption and
cardiovascular risk factors. There were eight clinical trials &13 observational
studies. They did find coconut tends to increase LDL as well. The coconut Pro
Group would say, “Yeah – but it increases HDL even further.”If you look at
the actual studies, there’s not very much measurement of the HDL, so that’s
not well-founded – at least yet. Here’s their suggestion the
weight of the evidence from intervention studies suggest that
replacing coconut oil with CIS unsaturated fats would alter blood
lipids in a manner consistent with reduction in risk factor for
cardiovascular disease, So this study was obviously one that was quoted (this
meta-analysis was quoted) by that Center for Science in the Public Interest –
because it’s anti coconut oil. The bottom line is – the results (at least in
my mind) are still not that clear either way. Here’s another bottom line.
Maybe it doesn’t sound right. But why does it matter?
This is this is coconut consumption in the United States – starting back in 1964
and this is in 2016. So yes there’s been a little bit of increase, but not really
a whole lot. Iounds like a storm in a tea kettle. Thank you.