Binging with Babish: Turkish Delight from Chronicles of Narnia

Binging with Babish: Turkish Delight from Chronicles of Narnia

October 25, 2019 100 By William Morgan


Hey, what’s up guys, welcome back to Binging with Babish where this week, seeing as how our saccharine sweet
hails from both film and literature, it’s only fitting that this episode is brought to you by Audible.
You can get a free audiobook with a 30-day trial at audible.com/babish, that’s audible.com/babish
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Audible makes it easy to get more books in your life. My personal recommendation: “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F***”,
by Mark Manson. I think that’s a book that we can all learn an important lesson from.
And the book that we can learn a candy-making lesson from is
“The Chronicles of Narnia”. More specifically, the White Witch’s Turkish Delight.
We’re going to combine 4 cups of granulated sugar with 1 and 1/2 cups of plain tap water.
Stir over a medium-high heat until the sugar is completely dissolved.
Once it’s all dissolved, stop stirring and let it simmer for about 10-15 minutes until it reaches 240 degrees Fahrenheit,
better known as the softball stage.
Set the sugar mixture aside and in a large sauce pot, pour and make a mess out of a cup of corn starch.
Add to it 2 teaspoons of cream of tartar, and slowly whisk in 3 cups of tap water.
We want to make sure that there’s absolutely no lumps, so whisk constantly.
And we’re gonna heat that over medium-high heat again until it turns into, sort of like a glue
a very thick, sticky paste, to which we’re going to slowly start adding our sugar syrup,
again whisking constantly to make sure that everything is fully incorporated.
Go ahead and grab a wooden spoon and scrape down the corners and sides of the pan to make sure that you get all of that
cornstarch mixture out of any hiding places.
Bring the mixture to a gentle bubble, reduce the heat and cook it for one hour, stirring occasionally until it turns
a light golden brown, at which point we’re gonna add our desired flavoring. If we’re talking traditional Turkish Delight,
we’re talking two tablespoons of rosewater and some red food coloring.
Whisk again until completely combined, and pour into some square or rectangular casseroles that you’ve lined with plastic wrap
and rub down with vegetable oil.
And we’re gonna let that sit at room temperature for at least 4 hours or until completely firm.
And now it’s time to apply a decorative and finger protecting coating,
this is an half powdered sugar half cornstarch.
Start by generously coating your work surface, unwrap your now firm, um, Delight,
and coat it in the powdered sugar mixture before cutting it into 1-inch cubes.
Or 2-inch cubes, I and nor anyone else cares at all.
We’re then going to dust these pieces with some additional powdered sugar mixture,
roll them around to make sure that they’re evenly coated.
If you have an enchanted, magically-appearing bowl use that otherwise just use a regular bowl,
and it’s time for the all-important cross-section. And, even more important than that, the taste tests.
Now, I dislike this greatly. It doesn’t taste good at all, it tastes like potpourri.
Granted, I know that rosewater is an acquired taste,
but if you don’t have a taste for your mom’s perfume,
some other flavors would be very welcome, like orange blossom water, cinnamon extract, coconut extract or ginger extract.
Just pretty much anything but rosewater.
(Music)