Binging with Babish: Eggs Florentine from Frasier

Binging with Babish: Eggs Florentine from Frasier

October 31, 2019 100 By William Morgan


I have eggs benedict,
and eggs florentine
Did you bring ketchup?
Oh
No, I’m sorry. Let me get that for you right now.
Ketchup on eggs florentine?
Now, I remember ordering this
It’s the breakfast.
I always have after a night of passion.
Eggs Benedict? That’s very rich.
I only have it once a year [clip ends]
Hey, what’s up guys welcome back to Binging with Babish. Where this week I’ve partnered up with the Venetian Resort in Las Vegas
Who asked me to come up with a new secret room service item for their in-room dining menu
And I thought, despite its unfortunate inclusion of ketchup, the room service ordered on my favorite show in the whole wide world was probably a good way to go.
Plus, it’s an opportunity to make English muffins
We’re gonna start by combining one packet of instant yeast and a teaspoon of sugar enlisting help from tiny whisk of course, heating half a cup of milk to 110 degrees Fahrenheit
Adding it to the yeast and sugar mixture and allowing it to bloom for about 10 minutes. While we wait for that,
Let’s bust at our stand mixer
We’re measuring out 325 grams of bread flour that we’re going to sift into the bowl of our stand mixer
Let’s come up for a the name for this guy… “medium sized sieve”?
..It’s not very good
Once all the flour has been sifted
We’re adding our bloomed east mixture
Which you can see is kind of big and foamy,
along with just over a half a cup of water, a quarter teaspoon of baking powder, and a quarter teaspoon of baking soda.
Mix up this mélange with your paddle attachment
for about a minute until everything comes together and then it’s time to switch to our dough hook for a long, hard knead. You see
this is a very high hydration dough, around
75%, which means that it’s gonna be very sticky and very hard to work with. But, kneading it for 20 minutes non-stop
along with a nice long proof are gonna make what would normally be a pretty gooey mass a lot more
handleable. Now bear in mind it’s still gonna be sticky, but it should sort of straddle the line between
sticky and tacky. As such we’re going to generously oil a bowl for rising,
wrassle this guy out of here and you can see that as long as I keep my hands moving quickly,
the dough doesn’t actually stick to them.
Anyway, we’re gonna try to work it into a smooth ball, place it into our
oiled bowl, cover and let rise for at least 90 minutes, or until more than double in size.
Walk in and do your surprised hands shtick,
unwrap the wrap, and then it’s time to turn out. Onto a lightly floured work surface
that is. We don’t wanna add too much more flour to the dough itself
We just want to keep it from sticking to our countertop. So we’re scooping it out
and then we’re punching it down, and then rolling our guy out to about a half inch thickness
It’s gonna spring back some just be gentle, take your time with it. You want it large enough
so as you can cut six rounds using a 3-inch biscuit cutter.
I’m then placing them on a rimmed baking sheet lined with cornmeal
You can reform and roll out your dough scraps to make more muffins, but they’re going to be miss shapen.
So they’re perfect for testing temperatures, cook times, or for a little snack for the chef. We’re covering these and letting little rise one last
time for about 30 minutes until they’re slightly puffed up.
We’re scooping them out using a spatula one by one and then bringing them over to an awaiting cast iron skillet that has been
Preheating over medium heat for about three minutes. Working three or four at a time
We’re arranging these as close to the center of the pan as we can and then we’re giving them a good spritz with water
so they can rise a bit more during the cooking process. We want to keep a close eye on these things
not that kind of closed eye stupid. Yeah, I’m talking to you
Just let them cook for about three minutes, and then check them every
minute or so up to five or six minutes.. Just to make sure that they’re not burning and that they’re browning
evenly. After about five minutes in my case
I’m giving these a flip and then cooking for another four to five minutes on the other side
We can flip them again if you want a little bit of browning extra-credit
We’re cooking these to an internal temperature between 200 to 210 degrees
fahrenheit. Extracting it onto a wire rack for cooling and allowing to cool completely about thirty excruciating minutes. Now
I thought I’d try a little experiment and try spraying both sides of the English muffins..
But, this turned out to impede both rise and browning. I mean just look at the difference. Spray twice:
that’s not nice. Spray
once: you’re no dunce and I decided to sacrifice one muffin
so we could have a porny, pull-apart, nooks and crannies viewing party. What beautiful pillows upon which our eggs can lay their heads.
Speaking of which it’s assembly time
I’m simply sauteing some spinach and butter with a clove of crushed garlic
Salt and freshly ground pepper and letting those flavors get to know each other before we start poaching our eggs as you can see
I’m using
old wool pool method turning the water into a tizzy and
Dropping the egg into the center of the Whirlpool kill the heat cover and let sit for five minutes
Just enough time to make some blender hollandaise. Into the jar of a blender goes 4 large egg
yolks, the juice of half a lemon, a pinch of salt and a dab each of Dijon mustard
and hot sauce if you so desire.
We’re blending that together for 10 seconds just to get everybody
acquainted and then I’ve got one stick of piping hot butter that I’m going to stream in a very slow, very steady stream into the
blender as it runs. This method is pretty foolproof
But just don’t pour the butter too quickly or you will scramble your eggs.
And now as you can see
We’ve got a lovingly toasted fork split English muffin upon which we are depositing our spinach, followed by eggs
Give a little poke to make sure that they’re soft coat- they are – and for each a generous spoonful of hollandaise sauce
That’s the consistency we’re looking for,
we want it to just essentially drape over the egg. Not dreadfully drip, or flaccidly flow over the egg. [scoffs in disgust]
Anyway, before I kill all of our appetites it’s time for the first cross-section we’ve had on this show in a little while.
Let’s all wait on bated breath to see if I cook my eggs
correctly… and I did the yolks are runny, but just starting to set. That’s right where I like it for Eggs Benedict and Eggs Florentine.
Otherwise everything just gets too goopy. Oh, yeah. I almost forgot Lilith’s Lilith Lilith [stumbles over words]
Jesus that’s hard to say! Lilith’s surprise ingredient: ketchup. Which I got to say not a positive addition to this dish
This should be served on the side for whimsical and tributary purposes only. That said this is a clear entrant into the clean plate club…
Just, without the ketchup…. and definitely not to be eaten in the bathroom.
Hey guys, so I just want to say thank you again to the Venetian for sponsoring this episode.
The Venetian is a really gorgeous Resort in Las Vegas
and I for one am very excited to go there and order this secret menu item. If you go out there and try it and take
a picture, tag me on instagram, tag @VenetianVegas. If you want to find me I’ll be playing Texas Hold’em probably.
Just promise me. You won’t do this, please.