7 Facts About Simple vs Complex Carbs – Have You Been Lied To?

7 Facts About Simple vs Complex Carbs – Have You Been Lied To?

July 21, 2019 100 By William Morgan


Simple versus complex carbs. It should be
a really simple issue but some people
just make it so complex so there’s sugar
and there’s starch and there’s fibers and
there’s complex carbs so who do you
listen to? Today we’re going to cover all
the basics so that you get a crystal
clear picture so that you understand
everything and the next time someone
tries to give you some misinformation
then you won’t be misled because you
know how it works coming right up I’m
Dr. Ekberg I’m a holistic doctor and a
former Olympic decathlete and if you
want to truly master health by
understanding how the body really works
make sure you subscribe and hit that
notification bell so that you don’t miss
anything. So what is a carbohydrate? It
is something made from carbon that is
hydrated that means it’s carbon
molecules that they’ve added water to so
if you take carbon dioxide co2 and you
combine it with water that’s what a
plant does and then you add some
sunlight there’s a process called
photosynthesis that will turn that water
and that carbon dioxide into
carbohydrates and oxygen beautiful and
then animals like yourself and myself
take the carbohydrates take the sugar
and the starch and we use oxygen to burn
to combust that carbohydrate and we turn
it into energy and we breathe out carbon
dioxide and water so it’s a beautiful
reaction it runs flawlessly in both
directions and it serves both plants and
animals incredibly ingenious so the
thing to understand about that is that
all carbohydrates are sugar this is the
formula for a sugar molecule and it is
what makes up all plants plants can have
a tiny bit of protein they can
a tiny bit of fat like a percent or a
few percent but the vast majority of the
plant is a carbohydrate and it doesn’t
matter if you call it sugar or starch or
fiber it’s all the same stuff that is
just put together differently but a
plant is sugar the second thing that we
need to understand is that plants store
energy they store their mass their bulk
as carbohydrates so a tree the wood it
is carbohydrate is just sugar molecules
linked together in a certain way to make
wood vegetables plants fruits grass its
leaves it’s all the same stuff and the
plant stores everything as a
carbohydrate humans on the other hand we
can’t store much carbohydrate we can
take the carbohydrate we can convert it
into fat which is the preferred the
effective the efficient long term
storage form of energy for humans so
that’s the difference they make stuff
for us we make stuff for them they store
carbohydrate we store fat and to some
degree protein but very little
carbohydrate then the third thing to
understand is that all these sugar
molecules they are put together in
different ways they have different
configurations and that determines their
properties so the basic form when nature
makes a carbohydrate of this formula
c6h12o6 it puts it together in a ring so
there’s six carbons and it makes a six
carbon ring that’s the basic formula for
all carbohydrate and in its simplest
form in a single ring we call that
glucose or fructose or galactose those
are the three basic rings and those are
the fundamental indivisible unit of
carbohydrate it can be broken down
further when it’s
burn when it’s metabolized but that’s
the basic unit that’s called a mono
saccharide mono meaning single it’s a
simple sugar it’s small enough to be
absorbed directly into the bloodstream
when you eat a food that has glucose or
fructose or galactose we don’t need any
enzymes we don’t need to break it down
further it’s already in its basic
formula it’s ready to go straight into
the bloodstream then if we take two of
these basic units and we put them
together as a pair it’s called a
disaccharide
and even though that’s still a simple
sugar like if we combine glucose and
fructose together it makes sucrose
that’s table sugar so it’s still a
simple sugar but it’s too big to be
absorbed directly into the bloodstream
so we have to use an enzyme to split it
up and that takes a few seconds it’s a
little bit of delay between breaking it
down and absorbing it and glucose is of
course this six carbon ring fructose is
a five carbon ring not that it matters
tremendously but it’s a little bit
different and it has that six carbon
hanging off by a thread so to speak and
because of that it’s the only the liver
that can metabolize only the liver can
deal with fructose whereas every cell in
the body can deal with glucose only the
liver can deal with fructose and we’ve
talked about the ramifications of that
in other videos like fatty liver and
insulin resistance and so forth so you
can look up videos on those topics as
mammals the first thing we were exposed
to was lactose that’s in milk and
Mother’s Milk and that has one piece
glucose and one piece one unit galactose
and while we’re kids we have plenty of
lacked lactase enzyme to break that down
as we age especially certain populations
like Asians tend to
lose their ability to break down that
lactose very efficiently they can do
well with yogurt because that already
has some of those enzymes in there if we
have two glucose molecules side by side
we take two of the same thing and just
hook them together
it’s called maltose so these are
disaccharides we need an enzyme to break
them down but there’s still simple
sugars now the next step would be to
link multiple units of glucose and now
we usually don’t differentiate we don’t
call them three or four or five we just
say many and it’s called a poly
saccharide and there’s different forms
of polysaccharides but typically nature
links them up in three different ways
either it puts them together in a
straight chain and then it’s called
amylose or we put it together in a
branched chain it’s like a tree it can
diverge and then it’s called amylopectin
most of the bulk of starch is a amylopectin so amylose and amylopectin is
starch most of it occurs in the form of
amylopectin a little bit in the form of
amylose and at first it looks like the
amylose would be simpler that it would
be faster to break down because you can
just chop off these things one by one
but it turns out that amylopectin is the
one that’s easier to chop up that
because it’s branched it has a surface
larger surface area it’s not as tightly
packed and when the body goes to break
it up the amylopectin gets gets
chopped off very very quickly the third
way is to link the same glucose
molecules the same basic six carbon ring
but if we twist it around instead of
putting them side-by-side we twist one
of them
then it’s called a beta link and that’s
the fourth thing to understand that we
can link them together in different
units different numbers of units but
then there’s two different bonds two
different links if it’s called an alpha
link if it’s side-by-side then humans
have the enzyme to break it down it’s
called amylase and then it becomes food
and starches or food if it’s twisted
then it’s called a beta link and humans
do not have the enzymes to break it down
most mammals can’t consume fiber can’t
utilize can’t metabolize fiber some
animals like cows can do it indirectly
because they have four stomachs that are
host to specific bacteria that can break
down this beta link so that’s why they
can eat grass and sawdust and things
like that and turn it into energy so
fiber can be broken down by bacteria
because it has a beta link fiber cannot
be broken down by humans we can never
ever break down a single bond we can’t
use a single molecule that’s why even
though this is glucose even though it’s
sugar linked together we can’t use it it
never enters the bloodstream it has zero
impact on blood sugar and that’s why
cellulose also known as fiber just
provides bulk and it’s a good thing it
provides it improves the motility it
gives a bulk to our waste the fifth
thing that we have to understand is
glycemic index and this is where a lot
of people are confused they talk about
sugar is bad complex carbs are good and
it’s not that simple because at first it
looks like these complex carbs the
starches so amylose can be hundreds or
thousands of units linked together in a
long long long long chain so it seems
like it would take a long time to chop
up
that chain but that’s not the case it
goes pretty quick amylopectin can be ten
thousands or even a hundred thousand
units but it’s really fluffy and the
enzyme can get at it from many many
different direction and the enzyme is
really fast and we have amylase there’s
something called salivary amylase
meaning most of the amylase in the body
you make in the mouth so that you can
start breaking this down instantly the
moment to take a bite of something
starchy then you start breaking it down
into its smaller components so the
longer you hold something starchy in the
mouth the more you break that break it
down into sugar and it increases the
sweetness of the food the longer you
keep it in the mouth and this is why the
glycemic index the the speed with which
the food gets into the bloodstream as
sugar and increase its blood sugar is
about the same for table sugar and for
bread it varies a little bit depending
on how coarsely ground the flour is and
how much fiber is in there but pretty
much wheat bread and table sugar have
the same glycemic index they’re both
around seventy and officially a high
glycemic index would be everything over
seventy and a medium would be 55 to 70
and a low glycemic index would be less
than 55 but that’s a very distorted
scale that’s based on the assumption
that the only thing humans can eat a lot
of is grain that’s based on the food
pyramid that we have to eat 8 to 11
servings of grain and starches every day
but of course that’s why we have this
diabetes and obesity epidemic the the
scale should not be low below below 55
in my opinion if we abandon the idea
that we have to
our food on grain and starches and sugar
then I think a healthier scale would be
high would be anything above 40 which
means pretty much every grain there is
would be a high glycemic index which is
really what how it works a low glycemic
index would be something below 10 but of
course that would exclude every form of
grain and starch because there’s nothing
that gets down there the glycemic index
does not change much between
carbohydrates there’s slight differences
but pretty much all carbohydrates all
sugars all carbohydrates all starches
get chopped into sugar within minutes so
a complex carb is not very different
it’s just minutes away from becoming
sugar and that’s why the glycemic index
is not very different for between
carbohydrates the sixth thing we have to
understand is after this glycemic index
when we eat high glycemic food then that
increases the blood sugar get absorbed
quickly in the bloodstream blood sugar
goes up we have a very limited ability
to use the blood sugar and to store the
blood sugar so here’s what happens in
the bloodstream your body wants
somewhere between 80 to a hundred
milligrams of glucose if you just had a
meal you might allow it up to 120 but it
should be within a very narrow range and
in a previous video I said that’s
equivalent about a teaspoon or five
grams of sugar and a very clever viewer
pointed out to me that since the blood
is about 40% solid meaning red blood
cells and the sugar is dissolved in the
liquid portion it’s actually even less
than that so the circulating portion of
blood sugar is more like 3 grams just
over half a teaspoon and anything above
that that we can’t use in the next few
minutes has to be moved out
the bloodstream and into the cell and
that’s what insulin does so insulin
takes all the excess and that’s the red
portion here so we want to keep things
in the middle range here and if we eat
mostly fat and protein and leafy greens
then we will stay in that range once we
start eating sugar and carbs and
starches and breads and tubers and
processed food a blood sugar Rises very
quickly anything above that level is an
emergency it is toxic to the body the
body will ring its alarm bells and it
will start to get rid it would do
everything it can to get that blood
sugar out of the blood and into the
cells and now the cells are happy to
take some of it but it can only take so
much and if we ate once or twice a day
then we could put some of the
carbohydrates in storage we can store it
as glycogen and then when we don’t eat
for a while if we don’t eat for a half a
day or a day or even two then we will
pull out the glycogen again and use it
and we get ready for the next meal but
ever since humans discovered grain
started cultivating grain and started
making it available at all times of the
day and humans started eating three
times a day with snacks on top now we
push the blood sugar into the cell and
the cell can use some of it but before
it had a chance to use it up and to burn
through that glycogen here comes another
batch and when we eat three to six times
a day
the cell never has a chance and it
starts to get too much and the only
thing it can do at this point is to
convert that glycogen into fat that’s
what insulin does it’s a storage hormone
and like I said plants are they store
everything as carbohydrate humans can’t
do that we can burn carbohydrates but we
can only store fat and if we eat
carbohydrates too frequently then we
have to convert
the excess to fat and we never get a chance
to retrieve it we never get a chance to
use it for energy because there’s always
more stuff coming and the seventh fact
you need to know is have a rough idea of
what foods have carbohydrates so based
on what we talked about you already
understand that animal foods because
animals can’t store carbohydrate if you
eat animals food you’re not getting any
carbohydrates fat and meat oils even if
they’re there plant oils like avocado
oil or coconut oil or extra virgin olive
oil they only have the fat portions so
there’s no carbohydrate in that but meat
and fatty meat and organ meats they have
and and cheese they are naturally free
of of carbohydrates then there’s things
that are low in carbohydrates and those
are things like dairy. Milk if you drink
a lot of milk that has a quite a bit of
lactose but if you just have like a half
a cup or a cup then it still considered
a low carbohydrate non starchy
vegetables are very very good because
they have no starch the plant the leafy
green is still a plant it’s still almost
a hundred percent carbohydrate but it
only has like one or two percent of
glucose fructose and sucrose in it
that’s why it doesn’t taste very sweet
if you juice it it tastes a little bit
sweet that’s the sugar in there but most
of what the plant is is fiber
leafy greens are mostly fiber and
therefore you’re only getting a trickle
of sugar you could eat eat a mountain of
green leafy vegetables and only get like
a teaspoon of sugar so it’s it’s there’s
a very small amount and it’s absorbed
very very slowly in the medium carb
category we have things like fruit fruit
tastes sweet so it has more sugar
then leafy greens and non starchy
vegetables and berries like raspberry
blueberry strawberry blackberry they are
lower in sugar whereas tropical fruits
like banana and pineapple and mango are
higher in sugar and then we have all the
high carbohydrate foods those are things
like grains and tubers potato sweet
potato rutabaga etc and any food that
has been processed to remove fiber and
to concentrate the sugar so these are
foods that the majority of the food is
starch or sugar and like we said it
makes really very little difference if
it’s pure sugar or pure starch because
the starch is only minutes away from
being chopped into sugar and now we know
that it’s all the same stuff it’s all
just little rings of sugar that can be
hooked up in sets of two or three or
five or ten thousand but the end result
is the same it’s all sugar and the more
frequently you eat the less of it you
can tolerate because you tend to
increase blood sugar you store it and
you never get a chance to burn through
it if you have developed insulin
resistance now you have a lesser
tolerance so now you need to back off
both on the amount of carbohydrates and
the frequency of the meals so now you
know better about carbohydrates when
someone tries to tell you that table
sugar doesn’t have fructose in it you
know better when someone tries to tell
you that bread is okay because it’s a
complex carbohydrate that pasta is good
for you because it’s a complex
carbohydrate now you know better if you
want to learn more about exercise and
insulin resistance and diabetes and
weight loss and stress we have a whole
library of videos waiting for you and if
you’re new to the channel and you enjoy
this kind of content where you
understand the bigger pictures you can
make smart decisions rather than just
memorizing a list of things to do then
make sure that you’re subscribed
and hit that notification bell so we can
keep this information coming your way
I’ll see you in the next video thanks
for watching