10 Quick and Easy Healthy Meals and Snacks – CHTV Episode 60

10 Quick and Easy Healthy Meals and Snacks – CHTV Episode 60

July 19, 2019 2 By William Morgan


Dr. Pompa:
We’re live.
David:
You’re live!
Dr. Pompa:
I think we’re live.
David: You’re live!
Live on Cellular Healing TV, episode, I think,
number 59.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, so you can see we’re all together today.
David:
You’re in good hands.
You’re in good hands.
Dr. Pompa:
You can see what Dr. Pompa —
Phil:
[0:19] I’m going to lower you down.
Dr. Pompa:
Oh, you want to lower me down.
Anyways
Phil:
Can you get me something to sit on?
Some high pillows?
Dr. Pompa:
We had quite the day yesterday.
Sorry we’re a little bit late, but that’s
what happens when Dr. Pompa is actually the
host.
I’m here next to my co-host, fitness expert
Phil Kaplan, who’s laughing because I said
that probably ten times yesterday.
We were doing a show.
David is actually working on something else.
Phil:
That nutrition program that you gave me to
make me taller?
Let’s just see if it worked.
Dr. Pompa:
Let’s see.
We’re going to hold on one second.
Phil is trying our make us taller things.
Phil’s quite—I don’t know if you can see
what’s going on here.
Phil: It’s not working.
Dr. Pompa: It’s not working.
Phil:
Here we go.
That works perfectly.
David:
I’m IT today.
Dr. Pompa:
Alright.
That was probably the craziest start to a
show ever.
That’s what happens when Warren’s not here.
We misbehave, gentlemen.
Phil:
Good work.
Good work.
David:
[1:23] computer died.
Dr. Pompa:
David won’t be here, because we can’t fit
us all here.
Thank you, David.
Phil:
He’ll actually be here.
Just nobody will see him.
He’s right here.
Dr. Pompa:
I love doing shows with Phil.
Yesterday, we did quite a few shows, actually.
We’re taking this 180-degree concept to the
nation, I believe, to the world.
We’re flipping it.
We’re going 180.
No doubt about it.
We know that this message resonates with so
many people.
The message, the fact is the truth always
lies somewhere opposite of what the experts
say, and more importantly, what they say.
Phil:
That’s such a good way to say it, because
the truth always lies, and then you pause.
It sounds like truth lies.
180 degrees opposite.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s right.
Phil:
Yeah, that was funny yesterday.
Dr. Pompa:
It was.
We did have a lot of fun.
We’re teaching and preaching this from our
heart.
We’ve been blessed.
We have some amazing opportunities to really
broaden this message and bring it to the planet.
That’s our goal.
Phil:
You know why you’re a genius?
Dr. Pompa:
I was thinking that —
Phil:
I don’t either, because when you took this
concept and coined that phrase 180 degrees,
it’s amazing how many things fall into that.
Just doing that yesterday—no thought went
in.
I was just spontaneous, off the cuff.
So many things are the complete opposite of
what they said.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, no doubt.
Yeah, we keep saying to ourselves, “We have
to do a show on that.
We have to do a show on that.”
It even actually happened at dinner last night.
You want to tell the corn story?
Phil:
Polenta.
Dr. Pompa:
We were eating at one of our favorite restaurants.
Phil:
I hadn’t eaten all day, and I was very—
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, he did say he was going to chew off
an arm.
That’s one of Warren’s favorite sayings.
You can see, he’s got a lot of muscle to maintain,
so you’ve got to keep food in Phil.
Otherwise, he can get cranky.
We were there, and of course Phil had ordered
something, and I was asking questions about
the polenta and the corn, and asking my typical
questions.
Phil:
The waiter [3:31] the lamb shank goes with
the polenta.
You can’t separate the two, because that’s
what makes it so good.
It’s the mushrooms, the polenta—the whole
thing works together.
Dr. Pompa:
I’m going wait, if it doesn’t say 100% organic,
it’s GMO.
Phil:
I’m drooling, in the meantime.
I’m ready to eat anything.
Dr. Pompa:
Phil just was like, “Just give it to me.”
He probably felt bad for the waiter, number
one.
Number two, he was literally ready to eat
anything.
I’m like, “No, no, you can’t do it.
We don’t know.”
Phil’s like, Alright.”
Out of guilt and feeling angry at this point,
even at me, he’s like, “Okay, just do it the
way Pompa says to do it.”
Phil:
Dan, of course, will not eat anything GMO.
Dr. Pompa:
I won’t.
Phil: He knows that polenta comes from corn,
and he knows that corn is, of course, genetically
modified.
He’s standing his ground, despite the waiter
tapping into my hunger, going, “You’ve got
to get the polenta.”
I’m going, “Okay, okay.”
Dan’s going, “No, no, no.
No polenta.
They have original wheat,” right?
“They have original wheat.”
It turns out they didn’t have that.
Dr. Pompa:
Right, they didn’t have that.
Phil:
Farro and stuff?
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, farro, emmer.
It’s one of these original wheats.
They didn’t have that.
Phil:
Now the guy goes, “You’ve got to go with the
polenta.”
I’m like, “Okay.”
Dan goes, “No, no, no, can’t get the polenta.
Anything’s better than the polenta.”
Dr. Pompa:
Right, anything.
Yeah.
Don’t risk the corn.
As it turns out—he comes back ten minutes
later, and he—
Phil:
[4:54].
Dr. Pompa:
His point was, “No, no, this stuff’s from
Italy.”
I’m like, “I believe it’s from Italy.
You’re not going to convince me.”
He brings this brick of polenta.
Sure enough, it’s from Italy.
His point is, “They don’t do that there.”
He is right.
A lot of the European nations—
Phil: You’re still resistant.
Dr. Pompa:
I am, I am.
Phil: I don’t believe this.
It’s all written in this somewhat—I don’t
even know what it says.
Dr. Pompa:
My son, sitting next to me, googles the name,
googles the company.
Lo and behold, he was right.
It was certified GMO free.
Which, they did.
They threw out a lot of the GMO in Europe.
What happened in this country—but the European
Union absolutely is saying, “No GO.
We don’t want GMO.”
Phil:
End of the story is, the waiter was right.
That was good.
That was good.
Dr. Pompa:
The waiter was right.
I gave him credit.
Phil: By the way, you promised a plug for
the restaurant.
Dr. Pompa:
Girasoles in Pittsburgh, we love that place.
Family restaurant.
A home-cooked meal.
There you go.
You’re right.
Thank you for that.
Today’s show is something that I think—one
of the last shows I said I really want to
do this show.
One of my clients said, “Dr. Pompa, I want
the five things that you do daily, all the
time, that keep you looking young and keep
you vibrant and healthy.”
I thought, that’s great.
I just rattled them off to him.
It was boom, boom, boom, boom, boom.
There’s the five.
I said, “You know, Kurt, that’s a great show.
I’m going to do a show on that.”
We did.
The same thing happened this week.
One of my clients said to me, “I’m just having
trouble with lunch and what to do with that
simple, easy meal.
I don’t cook.
I need something very simple.”
I’m thinking to myself, that’s me.
I don’t do much cooking either.
Don’t want to.
She said, “It has to be simple, but it has
to be on the diet.
I want just ten things that you do.”
I answered you, I said, “I am not the one
to answer this, because I’m not the cook.
I’m not the one who does things.”
Then I said, “I’m going to attempt it.”
I started just typing out ten things, and
I’m thinking, I will never get to ten, but
I’m going to make it, and I’ll get to maybe
five, six, or at best seven and say I tried
and I hope this helps.
I just rattled off ten.
It was actually easier for me than I thought.
I want to share those ten things that I do,
because I don’t want to take time to cook.
I’m a very busy person, and that one or two
o’clock meal in my afternoon has to be really
simple.
Admittedly, most of the time I just do some
type of little protein and some fat, whether
it’s coconut oil, X-Factor Butter Oil and
some protein, and I move about my day, but
I came up with ten things that I do.
I realized I do these things very often.
I want to share those ten with you, and I
want Phil to, well—
Phil:
Applaud.
Dr. Pompa:
Applaud.
Phil:
Okay, you read them off.
Dr. Pompa:
No, obviously I could just rattle these things
off on the show.
Let’s talk about them.
Phil:
Yeah.
A good place to start would be with the first
one.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, that’s a good place to start.
Number one was, and this is very simple, you
go in all the health food stores, they have
the Applegate turkey breast, chicken breast,
right, and it’s organic.
You take that, and I make lettuce wraps with
it.
You go in there—I put a little bit of cheese
on it.
I take some romaine lettuce, and I wrap it
up.
I get the—it’s the healthy mayonnaise, made
with the grapeseed oil.
Put a little bit of mayonnaise.
Sometimes I like those good, organic, kosher
pickles.
I just got really hungry talking about them.
I put the meat and I put the pickles.
I put a little bit of the mayonnaise.
I wrap it up, and I eat that as a snack.
Literally takes me a second to make.
You like that one?
Phil:
I like it.
It’s interesting, because back in the bodybuilding
days for me, you have to get to a meal every
15 minutes, right?
We used to do that.
We would look at the turkey, the sliced turkey,
as the wrap, and we would stuff all kinds
of stuff in it.
It’s nice that you do that.
I think you could come up with a whole bunch
of different options.
I bet the viewers could probably come up with
what else they could come up with.
Dr. Pompa:
Absolutely.
Black olives.
Black olives.
Phil:
Wasabi, too.
Dr. Pompa:
Wasabi’s actually good.
Yeah.
I’m thinking [9:08].
Phil:
I’m thinking some celery in there, with a
little bit of wasabi mustard.
Dr. Pompa:
Uh-huh, most mustards are good.
Phil:
It’s crunchy.
Gives it the crunch.
Dr. Pompa:
Most mustards are good.
Most mustards are healthy.
It’s typically mustard seed, ground up with
a little bit of vinegar and some spices.
That is what really most mustards consist
of.
With that said, you’ll get the bad mustards
that’ll start loading up sugars and some other
things, and if you can’t read it, don’t eat
it.
That was one of our messages—
Phil:
Yeah, I just like that idea, because you can
create a lot of different meals using the
turkey as the wrap for it.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, well we do the turkey on the lettuce,
so then we don’t have to actually—but I’ve
done what you said.
I’ve literally taken the turkey, I put black
olives, a little bit of the mayonnaise stuff
in there, and rolled the turkey and just ate
it like that, too.
Of course, if you actually—
Phil:
You take those little toothpicks with the
frilly stuff on top, and then you can serve
them.
Dr. Pompa:
Now we went beyond—now we’re talking about
garnishes.
Phil:
Right, we’ve only covered one [10:02].
Dr. Pompa:
Number two.
Cheese that’s organic, okay, and grass-fed.
Raw is best, but most cheese that is raw is
typically a good cheese.
Grass-fed is the most important.
I typically can just literally, in the middle
of the day, chunk of cheese.
I bring it with me.
I used to give it to my kids, when they were
young, for snacks.
Just some good hunk of cheese with some olives.
Things like that, that’s a quick, easy meal.
People wouldn’t think of cheese as a meal,
but it’s a perfect food.
It has the perfect fats, perfect bacteria.
I love the Beyond Organic cheese because it’s
loaded with [10:41] bacteria.
Phil:
And the rind, what most people throw away.
Dr. Pompa:
Absolutely, and the rind has all these unique
bacteria.
That’s the thing.
People don’t think of cheese as a food—it’s
literally a perfect meal.
Phil:
We’ve had some adventures.
One of them, we were driving across Florida,
and we stopped in a grocery store.
Remember?
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah.
Phil:
We were trying to find something that is organic,
satisfying, tasty.
It’s hard.
It’ s hard navigating the grocery store.
I remember what we found.
We found [11:12].
Dr. Pompa:
That was the regular grocery store.
Organic pistachio nuts, cheese—
Phil:
We got some avocados and we got some cheese.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s right.
That was a meal.
Phil:
You’ve got to look.
It’s not easy to even find raw cheese.
Dr. Pompa:
We did, though.
It was a regular grocery store.
We found some raw—it was actually grass-fed,
raw cheese.
It was fantastic.
Phil:
It was $600, but it was a good meal.
Dr. Pompa:
It was a darn good meal.
Then the pistachios, which is actually a really
good point.
If you have some cheese and some nuts, now
you have something going on.
Phil:
The question is, how do you break the pistachio
addiction after.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, the whole car was filled with pistachios.
Remember the scene, I think it was—not Airplane.
What was it, where the cops were sitting in
the car?
They were sitting there all day, staking somebody
out, and they were eating pistachios.
They were going, and there was conversation.
They were still eating pistachios.
Finally, they had to get out of the car to
go bust the person, and they couldn’t get
out.
They went to go open the doors, and the pistachios
were too high.
They couldn’t get out.
Phil:
I can see that, like when we got out of the
van.
You open the door, pistachios dumping out.
Dr. Pompa:
Okay, number three.
One of the things that—again, this is probably
something you have to get not in a regular
grocery store, but in a health food store
they have the cottage cheese.
I love cottage cheese.
It reminds me of my childhood, with a little
salt and pepper and olive oil on it.
You can even slice up some avocado.
You have to watch out, because most of the
cottage cheese is fat free or 2%.
You know, from this show, that we go for the
whole fat.
The whole, real deal cottage cheese.
By the way, at Whole Foods, I can speak of,
and I think in most health food stores, they
have the grass-fed cottage cheese from grass-fed
cows.
That’s a really good choice.
Phil:
It’s funny you say that, because there was
a time that, of course, everybody was looking
for low fat, fat-free.
My parents asked if I could stop at the store
for them and pick up a few things.
One of them was cottage cheese.
They didn’t have whole cottage cheese.
It was all fat free, one percent.
Dr. Pompa:
If you went to a regular grocery store, I
bet that would be true.
Yeah.
Let’s talk about, just for a quick moment,
because this is a major 180-degree concept.
Most of our viewers, they get that we’re 180
on this whole fat thing.
Let’s talk about the body [13:27].
This guy sitting to my right, he really is
a celebrity.
He was very good friends with Joe Weider.
He wrote many of the articles in “Flex Magazine,”
“Muscle and Fitness.”
I do have to tell a quick story on that.
Back in the day, you were probably writing
articles, as was I—some were different,
perhaps, about low fat.
Go low fat, that was the bodybuilding right?
Don’t eat fat.
Am I right?
Phil:
In the very early days of bodybuilding, when
I first started competing at 19 years old,
here’s what I learned.
There are two parts of the year.
There’s the bulking season and there’s the
cutting season.
The bulking season, rice, potatoes, anything
that you can get.
Then you went to the cutting season.
Tuna out of the can.
Tuna and spring water out of the can.
You didn’t want to get any fat.
Dr. Pompa:
No fat.
Zero fat at all.
Phil:
You’re right.
As time went forward now and there were more
options, people would say, “Is dairy good
or bad?”
The low fat choices are the good choices,
right?
We learn a lot.
We learn a lot.
Dr. Pompa:
Absolutely.
Phil:
I think one of the things we spoke about yesterday
that’s relevant here is, when somebody does
something altruistic and positive and they
bring about a chance in a food or a food source,
if the food manufacturers can exploit that
to make money, they run with it.
That’s exactly what happens.
When you talk about the sheep concept, everybody
following—well back in the day when low
fat was attractive, everything, every single
thing, even if it didn’t have fat in it to
begin with, it would say fat-free.
Dr. Pompa:
Then we’d be getting to the point where even
if we were recommending low fat, we realized
that the most unhealthy products were low
fat.
If you wanted an unhealthy product, low fat.
Sugar free became the same problem.
If it said sugar free, typically you were
ingesting chemicals that actually made you
more fat.
Low fat products became that thing that made
you [15:25].
Phil:
You know what’s a great example, because we
covered this yesterday, one of the [15:28]
is the cooking spray.
It says for fat free, calorie free cooking.
Zero calories.
Zero fat.
You look at the ingredients, and it’s canola
oil.
It’s 100% fat, but the food companies learned,
if we say low fat, it doesn’t matter if it’s
true, people will buy it.
Yeah, it’s the sheep following.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, they can manipulate the serving size
and how that works to literally say no fat,
no calories, no nothing, but you’re spraying
canola oil, which is pure fat.
Phil:
Right.
I think the law says if there’s less than
half a gram of fat in a serving, you can call
a food fat free.
They don’t regulate what the food companies
refer to as a serving size.
Dr. Pompa:
A serving size is a drop [16:07] fat.
Phil:
It’s .2 grams.
It’s 100% fat, but there’s less than half
a gram of fat in a serving.
Dr. Pompa:
It’s tricky marketing.
Before we leave this topic—one point on
this topic of low fat and the marketing is,
what are we seeing today, with that same thing?
The moneymakers saw what the public wants,
so now it’s gluten free now.
Gluten free everything.
They’ve heard me say this on this show many
times.
If it says gluten free, look out.
It’s probably something that’s very unhealthy
that raises glucose, with tapioca starch,
potato starch [16:41] all of these things
that are actually called super [16:44] that
actually raise glucose more.
Watch out for gluten free products.
Phil:
You hear that?
It’s the sound of number four coming up, because
we’ve got to stop here.
We went off on a tangent.
Dr. Pompa:
I’m not listening to him on this, because
I have to tell this story.
Then I will get to number four.
He’s trying to get me off track, because he
knows what story I’m going to tell.
This is a true story.
Phil, his mom, when his wife was pregnant—ex-wife
was pregnant with your beautiful daughter,
Brooke—commercial break.
Phil:
Yeah, commercial break.
Dr. Pompa:
For Italian polenta from Girasoles.
Then it went into another commercial about
gluten-free products.
Sorry about the commercial.
Phil:
Welcome back.
Dr. Pompa:
I was telling the story.
That’s what I’m thinking, actually.
You didn’t want to tell the story, so [17:28]
with the foot pedal.
The story is, is that his mother was lecturing
the fitness expert that his pregnant wife
should not be working out while she’s pregnant.
Phil:
They don’t know my mother.
He knows my mother.
You get the whole thing.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, the typical Jewish mother.
Preaching to him that, “This is not good,
Phil.”
Phil:
“She should not exercise.”
Dr. Pompa:
“She should not exercise.”
Phil:
“She should not exercise.
She’s pregnant.
Do you understand a pregnant woman needs to
rest?
What are you doing?
Stop her.
Stop her.
What’s with this trainer?
You should not have a trainer.
She should be with a doctor.
She needs to rest.”
Dr. Pompa:
[18:07] Italian mother imitation.
It’s about the same, by the way.
Okay, so now, here, fast forward.
One day she picks up this magazine on the
coffee table, and she starts reading—
Phil:
In my house.
Dr. Pompa:
In his house, starts reading from this article.
“You should listen to this.”
Phil:
[18:25].
Dr. Pompa:
“Muscle and Fitness.”
“This says that a woman in the first trimester,
actually, some exercise can be helpful.”
She’s saying all these things.
Finally, Phil walks over and says, “Give me
that.”
He looks, and he says, “Mother, look at the
author on the article.”
She looks at the author.
It’s Phil, right?
Phil wrote the article.
Instead of saying, “Okay, well you were right,”
she puts the article down, and it was never
talked about ever again.
Phil:
Which leads me, and I think everybody will
be able to relate to this—mammals are not
wired to learn from their young.
You can’t teach the parents.
That why you talked to my mom.
Dr. Pompa:
I don’t know that that worked either.
They’re just wired not to learn sometimes.
Phil:
That was fun, though.
Dr. Pompa:
No, it was fun.
That does bring us to number four.
David turned off my phone.
This isn’t my phone.
He took mine.
Phil:
Okay, so [19:17].
Dr. Pompa:
Okay, so number four was—I was looking at
my little list, right, and I had it on my
phone.
David, of course, fixes the problem and walks
off with my phone.
Now I’m going to think.
Okay, we had the cottage cheese.
Coconut, I think, was number five.
I’ll find number four in a minute, in my head.
If you go to the grocery store and you find
the real coconut, right—again, this is too
much work.
Sometimes, you can have it already shelled,
but you’ve got to take the coconut pieces—and
if you do this, you can have them in your
refrigerator all week, right, but I love taking
those coconut pieces and putting some raw
almond butter or cashew butter on those coconut
pieces, and I love eating those as a snack.
Amazing fat, and obviously just satisfies
that hunger.
Phil:
When you get the raw almond butter, the oil
is separated.
You have to mix it.
Dr. Pompa:
The raw almond butter?
Sometimes.
Not every brand does that.
Phil:
[20:15] I just wondered if there’s a process
when then homogenize it.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, it says just from almonds, but—I don’t
know the answer, but—I don’t know the answer.
Phil:
Okay, so organic, raw, almond butter.
Dr. Pompa:
You’d better text David and tell him he has
my phone.
I’m not going beyond any of these.
Okay.
I’m going to have to recreate this.
I think I hear feet coming down the steps.
I hope that’s for me.
Phil:
Should I text him?
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, text him.
Oh, I know.
We talked about the avocado.
I’m sure it’s his phone, because he took my
phone.
The avocado.
I love using a little bit of avocado, and
I do different things within it.
I cut the avocado in half, and I can either
put black olives in there—yeah, you have
my phone.
Yeah, we’re cracking up right now, because
I was winging it.
I was doing my top ten from memory.
David:
That’s what happens.
When you talk about the iPhone 6 Plus, you
talk about social.
Then, all of a sudden, you get the same phone.
Dr. Pompa:
Crazy, right?
Let’s see how I did.
Okay, so I did five—
Phil:
It’s good we rehearsed this show.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, that’s right.
A real coconut piece with almond butter was
five.
I was right on that.
The one that I missed, number four, was grass-fed
yogurts now, which you can actually buy in
those health food stores, right?
Of course, I love Amasi, because it has way
more—I know where the product comes from.
These cows not only eat grass, but they eat
grass from cows that are doing this high-intensity
grazing.
The nutrient levels are through the roof.
The fat is perfect.
The bacteria levels unique, different.
Let’s say you can’t get a Beyond Organic product
for some reason.
You should look up how to do that on our website,
but you can just go and you can get different
grass-fed yogurts.
Once again, Phil, we run into the problem
that most of the products are going to be
low fat yogurt.
I know that people like the—what’s the Greek
one now?
They like that.
They have full fat version that people love.
There’s many grass-fed options that are full
fat, but again, that probably—
Phil;
There’s Oikos.
There’s Chobani.
There’s a whole bunch of them.
Dr. Pompa:
You know better than me, half the names.
Phil:
I’ll tell you what.
The best market is for yogurt.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, so let’s talk about that.
Phil:
They actually list the probiotics, right?
You look at that.
If you’re looking at the wall of yogurts—
Dr. Pompa:
You’re listing them [22:32].
They’re just putting them in, right?
They’re putting in some probiotic.
Phil:
Then they feed the probiotic sugar.
That’s what they do.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s exactly what they do.
When you look at these products, there’s no
listed probiotic, especially in [22:45] because
they’re not putting it in.
It’s there naturally.
Good tip.
That was good.
I like it.
Number six.
I did say that one, too.
I said the avocados.
Different things with the olives.
You can make a lot of different dishes just
slicing an avocado in half.
I even have people like almond butter with
their avocado, which seems really odd, but
cottage cheese with it is great.
A little bit of olive oil.
Another perfect meal.
We’re getting through it.
Number seven.
Okay, number seven.
If you go into health food stores, they have
the healthy hot dogs.
They have the bison hot dogs.
They have the sausages now.
People don’t think of that, because they think
of a hot dog as being bad.
Applegate, some of these other companies now,
many more, they make healthy organic, grass-fed
hot dogs and sausages.
That, to me, is a quick meal.
Even me, I can throw one of those in the oven
or boil water, some way to cook it, and that’s
a quick meal.
I’m going to slice up an avocado with that.
Now you have a combination.
Now you put a little bit of the cottage cheese
on that, as we talked about, and now you have
another combination.
Now we’re combining these things into snacks.
Anything you want to say from the bodybuilding
world about that?
Phil:
No.
Dr. Pompa:
Alright, well here’s one from the bodybuilding
world I think you’ll relate to.
Hardboiled eggs.
I bet you’re one of those people that literally
had hardboiled eggs everywhere.
Traveled with hardboiled eggs, [24:14] car.
I was one of those people.
Phil:
I had a cooler, and there came a point you
couldn’t wash it out anymore.
It smelled so bad that you would throw it
away and buy another cooler.
Dr. Pompa:
[24:25] the eggs break open, and eventually
the eggs.
You could go into any gym, back in the day,
as we say, and there was always a hardboiled
egg stench somewhere, or a tuna stench, as
you mentioned, because the hardboiled egg
was something that was part of every bodybuilding
diet.
Phil:
It was the perfect protein.
Dr. Pompa:
However, what did we see happen in those days?
You had brought this up yesterday, and I [24:51].
Phil:
The yolk became evil.
The evil yolk.
You must only eat the egg whites.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s right.
Of course, the bodybuilders, back in the day—
Phil:
All the fat, the bad stuff, is in the yolk.
Dr. Pompa:
Of course, they would do the egg white omelets.
By the way, you still, even in Whole Foods
and other places, you can still get the eggbeaters.
Is that right?
It’s the whites.
Just the whites.
Phil:
There are some body building centers, gyms,
health clubs, where they have a juice bar,
and as one of the base liquids that they put
in, they’ll put in liquid egg whites.
That’s the super duper muscle building shit.
It looks like a milk container.
Dr. Pompa:
Right, just the egg whites.
Phil:
Do you want water?
Do you want milk?
Do you want almond milk?
Do you want egg whites?
Dr. Pompa:
I’m going to go 180 on this, and I’m going
to tell you, here’s what I do for my very,
very sick clients.
I’m telling them to add extra yolks.
You know why.
Someone who’s sick and challenged the fat
heals the membrane.
R #2.
Regenerate the cell membrane.
That’s how you fix hormone problems.
That’s key for weight loss resistance.
That’s key for just about every form of problem.
What is in that egg yolk that we know that
helps that cell membrane so much?
There’s a few things.
Phil:
Saturated fat.
Dr. Pompa:
You got it.
Cholesterol, right?
The two main fats that really stabilize the
insulin receptors or the thyroid hormone receptors
or the leptin receptors, the hormone receptors
in general.
Then, also, egg yolks actually are loaded
with something, sulphur.
So many people that are sick and challenged
are actually sulphur depleted.
Once you become sulphur depleted, you actually
have trouble detoxing, especially things like
heavy metal.
When you take in more egg yolks, you’re actually
increasing your sulphur.
Cholesterol sulfate, where cholesterol meets
sulphur, is actually the most important fat
for the brain.
Cholesterol sulfate, you actually need for
your brain to work.
Cholesterol sulfate, you need to really make
so many neurotransmitters.
It plays a major role in just thinking normal,
feeling normal.
Almost every process in the body.
Most people today are actually cholesterol
sulfate deficient.
That’s [27:04].
Phil:
For the guy that didn’t have any meal options,
you’re doing a good job.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, can you believe that?
I really didn’t think—I just went back into
these things that I do, which brings us to
number nine, which is actually—this is something
my kids actually reminded me of that I used
to do.
I would make them drink it.
They got used to it, after a while.
They called it Tigger Shakes, or Tigger Juice,
is what they called it.
I would take romaine lettuce or spinach.
I would put it in a blender, and maybe even
just a piece of orange, a piece of an apple—
Phil:
Did you put water in there, or it would be
enough just—
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, I would put some water in it, too.
A little bit of water, and I would blend it
up.
You would think that that would taste absolutely
horrendous.
I would like a scoop of whey protein in mine,
typically.
Now I have, basically, a balanced meal.
I have protein and I have salad.
I just wasn’t one of these people who had
enough time or even desire to put a salad,
chop it up—my wife, now she’s the big salad
eater.
She makes the salad, she puts the olives,
the almonds—she loves it.
She’ll sit there and chomp on this thing.
It’s not even making it, for me, that’s the
worst thing.
If someone makes me a salad, I’ll eat it,
but even then, for me it’s just chomping.
All that chewing, and all that chewing.
I’m done with it after a few chews.
I want to move on to the next thing.
I like drinking my salads.
My wife would never agree with me on this,
although she did drink a few.
I would make these things with the whey protein.
I would even put some olive oil in, maybe
some avocado.
Just that piece of apple or orange just livens
it up, just enough.
Maybe you can add a little bit of Stevia too,
which I did at times.
Those Tigger drinks, as my kids called them,
was the way I got salad in my children.
Phil:
You know what’s funny?
I recommend a drink very similar to the people
who go through my program, in the later weeks
of the program.
Some people go, “Eh, it’s horrible.”
When you don’t let them see the color, they
appreciate the taste.
People get freaked out by the green drink.
If you put beets in there, it turns a weird
shade of red, but if you put it in a cup that
they cannot see it, all of a sudden, they
appreciate the taste.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s a good idea.
Yeah, that’s a good idea until they look at
their lips.
They go upstairs and they look at this and
they’re like, “Oh, what’s he feeding me?”
Yeah, that’s another thing from the bodybuilding
days.
Maybe not lettuce, necessarily, but surviving
on shakes.
The shakes, the hardboiled eggs, and the tuna.
Did you guys eat anything else, besides those
three things?
Phil:
In bulking season, we would go to the Chinese
restaurant and get chicken fried rice.
We would get buckets of it, because we were
bulking.
We were carbing it up.
Dr. Pompa:
It’s so funny.
I remember it as another 180 concept.
If a bodybuilder was in that cut phase, right,
they would get on, I remember, the model bikes
or the treadmills, going for hours.
They would just sit there and do their low
endurance in that fat burning zone.
Now, today, you see the bodybuilders wising
up, and they’re doing more of the high intensity,
knowing that that raises growth hormone.
Phil:
There’s a whole new level of freakish bodybuilding
today.
Dr. Pompa:
The evolution of a bodybuilder.
Phil:
They don’t want to burn calories other than
in their workout.
Some gyms have two or three floors, and they
have an elevator for handicapped, The 300
lb., 6.6% body fat bodybuilder goes and waits
for the elevator, because he doesn’t want
to burn calories going up the steps.
Dr. Pompa:
I would not have believed it.
There’s a guy at our gym.
His name was Gene.
People that know me could finish Gene’s last
name, there.
I won’t embarrass him.
He would probably watch this and laugh with
me.
Gene literally would not cut his mother’s
grass.
My friend and I would just roar, because he
wouldn’t cut his mother’s grass.
He didn’t want to burn calories.
In his mind, he was going to lose his muscle.
That’s the sickness.
You’re right.
He would take elevators.
He would not take stairs, because he didn’t
want to burn calories and burn muscle.
That’s sick.
The evolution of a bodybuilder.
They go through that phase.
Talk about that evolution.
They start because they just want to be that
teenager who’s not scrawny.
They put a little muscle on, and then from
there—
Phil:
That’s a whole show.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, that’s a whole show.
Let’s just say where it ends.
It ends in that monster that we just partly
described.
Phil:
Who believes that he’s not big enough.
Dr. Pompa:
It’s true, and never going to be big enough.
Anyways, okay, this is one of my favorites.
I take hemp seeds, chia seeds, or salba seeds—by
the way, this is number ten, so we actually
made it, and—
Phil:
Roll them up and smoke them?
Dr. Pompa:
No.
That’s funny.
No.
We don’t use the CBD.
We actually just take the seed.
I like to put it—if you can get raw, grass-fed
milk, great, but I do a cereal with it.
Maybe get unsweetened almond milk, unsweetened
hemp milk.
I put the seeds in the bowl, and I pour a
little milk, and I eat it like cereal.
Add a little Stevia, some blueberries.
Phil: It’s good.
Dr. Pompa:
Oh my gosh, right?
Phil:
You know what makes it really good?
Dates?
Dr. Pompa:
Oh man.
See, now we’re salivating here.
Some coconut shreds, is another thing that
I love too add into that.
Adds a little bit of crunch.
I actually even add some walnuts oftentimes,
if I have them.
It adds the crunch, and you get the seed—as
it soaks in to the milk, it becomes very soft.
Phil: It actually has a very different consistency
than regular cereal.
At first, you’re surprised by it, but then
you realize it’s better.
Dr. Pompa:
From my childhood, that was the thing that
I miss.
Sitting down and eating, on Saturday morning,
that bowl of cereal.
Phil:
[32:46]?
Dr. Pompa:
Embarrassingly enough, I think it was the
pebble—what’s the [32:55].
Phil:
Fruity Pebbles?
Dr. Pompa:
Fruity Pebbles, yeah.
The way it crunched.
I like honeycombs, as well.
I have to say, it’s like, I did grow up on
a relatively good diet.
All my milk [33:09].
I remember eating eggs almost every morning.
The cereal addiction, I do remember that at
one point, where I would just carb up.
We ate really healthy, because mom—back
then, moms cooked.
Everything was cooked.
We didn’t go to fast food restaurants.
I think cereal was probably the worst thing
that we—
Phil:
Which was nowhere near where [33:32].
Dr. Pompa:
Nowhere near where it was today.
There as no GMOs—
Phil:
Did you ever get the snack pack, where it
came with eight little boxes?
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah.
Uh-huh, yep.
That was my addiction, no doubt about it,
as a kid.
All in all, we were blessed to not have to
deal with a lot of the foods that are—
Phil:
We had probably 20 of those little boxes of
Shredded Wheat, because nobody would eat that
one.
Dr. Pompa:
I actually love Shredded Wheat.
Phil:
We had the Lucky Charms, the [33:58].
The Shredded Wheat would stay there.
Dr. Pompa:
I actually like the Shredded Wheat, at one
point.
Phil:
You should’ve came to my house.
There was plenty.
Dr. Pompa:
Here’s what I would do, though.
I would sprinkle sugar all over it, right?
I like the crunch.
Remember then, they had the mini ones and
the big ones?
I actually liked those big ones.
They were literally this big.
Phil:
They didn’t have sugar on them, so you added
it.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, I’m sure I overdid it.
I remember literally, embarrassingly enough,
is just scooping piles of sugar as a kid.
My parents, they didn’t stop me.
Maybe they didn’t know.
Phil:
It was a different world.
We were different, as biological creatures,
and the food was different.
The truth is, what people are eating today,
when you mount it up with GMO and sugar and
[34:42] and bleach, it is a very different
world.
Dr. Pompa:
It is a different world.
Yesterday, we did talk a little bit about
excitotoxins.
When we were kids, we didn’t have those chemicals
that they put in foods.
It probably just started sometime, I know,
around then.
Today, these companies put these chemicals,
excitotoxins, and probably the one most of
you watching know is MSG.
It’s gone so far beyond that.
All the colorings, they’re all excitotoxins.
There’s other chemicals they’re putting in
food to get our children addicted to the food.
Talk a little bit about that, because it stimulates
part of the brain that creates the addiction.
Phil:
Yeah, there’s something that the food companies
refer to, privately, as bliss point.
What bliss point really is, if we look at
it chemically, it’s enough of a dopamine spurt
so that there will then be a dopamine drop.
Dr. Pompa:
By the way, when you take a drug, you’re getting
a dopamine spurt.
Whether it’s cocaine, whatever it is, you’re
getting a dopamine [35:50].
Phil:
The addiction center of the brain is called
the nucleus accumbens.
There was a very interesting study where they
took rats and they put electrodes, they wired
a machine, a device, to their nucleus accumbens.
There was a lever, and every time they hit
the lever, it stimulated the nucleus accumben.
There was a dopamine rush.
The rats that had that lever and learned to
use it all starved to death, because they
didn’t eat food.
They would rather hit that lever all day than
eat food, and that’s scary.
Dr. Pompa:
That’s the worst thing I ever heard.
Phil:
That’s what the food companies are doing.
The excitoxin’s really become a metaphor for
that lever.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, that’s amazing, because you do see that
when you look at kids today.
They have this posture [36:32] head.
They look malnourished.
If you follow them in a day—I had that experience.
I went to my kid’s ski camp with him, and
I watched what these athletes were eating.
They literally were eating excitotoxic meal
to excitotoxic meal, sugar loaded, chemical
loaded, artificial sweetener—everything.
Then, guess what was sitting next to their
beds?
These were athletes.
Medications.
Yeah.
Then their medications were next to the bed.
They were eating those foods.
They were hitting the lever.
They were addicted.
None of them want broccoli.
None of them want grass-fed meat.
None of them want real food.
Again, they would rather starve and hit the
lever.
Phil:
You just reminded me of something.
I’ll keep it very short, but my daughter,
when she was three, four, five years old,
had a neighbor across the street.
They became good friends.
The neighbor was a little older.
She was fun.
She was a fun girl.
They used to laugh together.
Every few hours, she would either cry or get
into a funk or start picking at her fingers,
always something, and it would be because
she needed sugar.
She would run home and she would have some
sugar, and then she would come back and she’d
be fine.
She was diagnosed with all sorts of—high-functioning
autism.
All kinds of diagnoses.
I went to her mom, and actually brought a
program from [37:53] and I gave it to her.
I said, “I just want you to understand the
link between the way you’re feeding your daughter
and her reactions, because all of the medications
that you’re taking aren’t making her better.
Do you see that?”
She never spoke to me again.
The mom just got mad.
“Why would you talk about my daughter?”
You witness it, and it’s horrible.
Dr. Pompa:
It doesn’t matter, because one day she’ll
look back at that conversation, I believe,
and say, “He was right.”
One day.
Phil:
She did take the program, and she never gave
it back.
It was an expensive program, if you’re watching.
Dr. Pompa:
Listen, I think that’s our show for today.
Phil:
Did you get to ten?
Dr. Pompa:
I did.
I said that.
I said, “By the way, that was ten.”
Phil:
I just wondered if you skipped one.
Dr. Pompa:
Do you want to add one?
Phil;
No, no, no, no.
Dr. Pompa:
Add one.
Give them a bonus, Phil.
Phil:
I don’t have one, but I will tell you this.
When I was in Costa Rica—if I tell you the
whole story, it’s completely inappropriate,
it’s [38:45].
My buddy and I went into this village.
We wanted to see how people really lived,
not the tourists.
They gave us coconuts, and they had a thick—it’s
like a reed that you jam through the coconut.
Dr. Pompa:
To get the milk.
Phil:
You drink it right out of the coconut.
I’ve got to say, I’ve never tasted anything
like that.
Just the other day, I happened to be in a
Whole Foods, and I saw they sell coconut with
the little straw.
Sure enough, it’s from Costa Rica.
Dr. Pompa:
Someone said, “Let’s take this to the planet.”
Phil:
Right.
I really think that it takes a lot of work
to learn to eat well.
It does, because there are so many forces
working against you.
Once you get there—just like I said, when
we went into that grocery store, we had to
hunt, but we found it.
It’s worth the hunt.
Dr. Pompa:
No doubt about it.
It is worth the hunt.
I think you said the challenge there.
We’re telling people, “Look, you’ve got to
be a three percenter to really be even able
to go after the hunt.”
Typically, unfortunately, it takes somebody
losing something that they cherish very much
to go after the hunt, whether it’s their energy,
their sleep, their anxiety, or faced with
death, which we have [39:53].
Then people will change.
I believe three percenters can make that change,
even without it.
Look, it takes a three percenter to go 180.
We’re hearing a message, day in, day out,
that fat is bad, that this is good [40:10]
difficult.
Phil:
My hope is that one year from today, we call
it a five percenter.
Let’s hope we make enough of an impact.
Dr. Pompa:
Yeah.
Every time I lecture before an audience, I
state those statistics.
I always said that my hope for this group
is that we reverse that.
97% move forward today.
The thing about being a three percenter, we
always say, it’s a decision.
It’s a decision to say, “I am tired of being
tired.
I’m tired of living this way.
I’m tired of seeing my kids this way.
Change.
Make a decision today.
Go 180.
We’ll see you next week.
Maybe one of the big future shows is kids’
health.
Kids’ diet.
I think that’s a great show.
Maybe we can have Phil back for that one,
because I think you added some [40:50].
Phil:
Most of your viewers [40:51].
Dr. Pompa:
Really?
I didn’t think about that.
That’s true.
Everyone can join, even though it’s about
kids.
We’ll see you on the next show.
Go 180.
Phil:
Bye, everyone.